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Medication Expiration Dates

Wednesday, March 11th, 2009

Question:
If expiration dates on medications such as aspirin and aleeve have passed should they be discarded or are these medications still useable.

Thanks,
David

Response:
Thanks for your question.  Most over-the-counter medications, including the ones you’re asking about, are safe to use after they expire.  The expiration date essentially means that the manufacturer of the medication will not guarantee its efficacy after the date has passed, not that the medication is unsafe once it expires.  In fact, military testing has found that common medications such as ibuprofen are still highly (if not 100%) effective ten years after the expiration date.  We do stock refill modules for our kits (you can view them at www.refillyourkit.com), although you probably won’t need to buy one until you start using up some the supplies in your kit.

Please contact us if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Jordan Hurder
Product Specialist

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Are Two Thermo-Lite Bivvies Better Than One?

Friday, January 30th, 2009

Question:
I own two Thermo-Lite Bivvies. If I put one inside the other, what level of performance increase (if any) will I get? I’m thinking about freezing wet temperatures in the Cascade Mountains.

Thank you,
Dean
Answer:

Hi Dean-

This is a good question.  We have done tons of real world product testing with one Thermolite, but not with two, so my response is based more on my own understanding of the product rather than anything I’ve experienced in the field.  Because the Thermolite material reflects 80% of your body heat, adding a second one probably won’t drastically increase the reflectivity.  You’ll get a little boost, but it’s already so high that you’re unlikely to notice a huge difference.

However, a second bivvy will act as a barrier against the heat emissivity of the first bivvy, preventing excess heat from leaving the surface of the material.  Additionally, by experimenting with the positioning of the two bivvies, you can cut way down on the ventilation (for example, if the second bivvy is upside down inside the first, the Velcro side-ventilation will be closed off), drastically reducing on the amount of heat that escapes.  Keep in mind that Thermolite is not a breathable material, though, so cutting down the ventilation will increase the condensation inside the bivvy.

As a result, I wouldn’t recommend this configuration as a primary sleep system… in freezing weather, if you are in an emergency situation, two Thermolites will probably keep you warmer than just one, but I highly encourage you to bring a cold-weather sleeping bag if you are venturing out in the Cascades during this season.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions.  Thanks for your interest!

Best,

Jordan Hurder
Product Specialist
Adventure Medical Kits

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Which kit should I keep in the house and car?

Friday, January 16th, 2009

Question:

Which kit would you recommend to keep around the house or in the car?

Thanks, Chris

Answer:

I have carried the Mountain Series Comprehensive Kit in my car for the past 20 years. It is my favorite kit and with the detachable inner bag inside you have a kit for day trips as well. Of course, any of the Mountain series kits would work well for the car or home. The Comprehensive has always been my favorite and it was the first kit Adventure Medical Kits launched in 1989.

BE SAFE,

Frank Meyer, Marketing Director/Co-Founder

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Heatsheets Blanket as Ground Cover?

Monday, January 12th, 2009

Question:
Regarding your Heatsheets and like items, how durable are they?  I was thinking of using them as a ground sheet.  I do ultralight backpacking and it would be a unique option if it was durable enough for more than one use.

Thanks.
James

Answer:

Hi James-

I got your question about using Heatsheets as a ground cover for Ultralight backpacking.  My answer would be a qualified “yes”… for a skilled ultralight backpacker, a Heatsheets blanket will make a suitable ground cover.  It won’t last forever, but the big advantage of the material is that it is repairable, meaning that if it gets torn or punctured, you can just tape up the blemish (or do nothing), and the blanket won’t crumble apart like a traditional mylar blanket will.  That being said, the material is extremely thin (I don’t have an exact measurement, but we’re talking thousandths of a millimeter here), so you would need to care for it in the field the same way you do with any other ultralight gear (eg- clear your shelter site from rocks, sticks, and pointy objects; treat it carefully when stored; etc.).  If you’re still in the process of making the transition to ultralight and most of your gear is still the standard bomber stuff you’d get at REI, I’d recommend developing your ultralight habits a little bit before relying on the Heatsheets blanket as your only ground cover.  However, if you already know how to treat a Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack differently from a Gregory Whitney and are down with silnylon, spinnaker, and Cuben fiber, I’d say to have at it.

Thanks again for your interest, and please contact me if you have any other questions.
Best,

Jordan Hurder
Product Specialist

ASK YOUR QUESTION – CLICK HERE

Which kit should I choose?

Friday, January 9th, 2009

Question:

Here’s a basic question… I’m getting back into backpacking after a good decade off. I am a 42 year old male and I will initially be taking 2-3 night trips in relatively remote locations . Some solo, but factor having up to 2 additional companions. Based on this info, can you offer some advice on which first aid kit would be the best combination of preparedness and size for this activity?

Answer:

Thanks for your question. I recommend the Ultralight/Watertight .7 or .9 for your 2-3 day backpack trips. If your first aid skills are a little rusty I would also recommend adding our book,  A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine. This book has a ton of useful advice, including, When to Worry, Weiss Advice Improvisational Tips and over 100 illustrations.

Be Safe,

Frank Meyer

Marketing Director/Co-Founder

ASK YOUR QUESTION – CLICK HERE

Will my sleeping bag fit inside my bivvy?

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

Question: Do you think i could fit a sleeping bag inside your emergency bivy?

AMK Answer:

Ian,

Thanks for your question.

It depends on how big your bag is. Most bags will, however extra long or below zero bags might be a tight fit.

The Heatsheets Emergency Bivvy is non-breathable so if you put a sleeping bag inside of it you would create a bit of condensation and perhaps get the outside of the bag and insulation wet. It would get you out of the weather however, so a little condensation would be a small price to pay. If your bag has a water resistant outer shell this would help kepp your insulation from getting wet.

I have used the Thermo-lite 2.0 Bivvy with a sleeping bag inside and although I did get some condensation, it was not of significant consequence. The Thermo-lite 2.0 Bivvy has a foot vent and side opening so there is more air flow helping to keep condensation down.

Let me know if you have any more questions.

Thanks,

Frank Meyer

Marketing Director/Co-Founder

ASK YOUR QUESTION – CLICK HERE

Does your moleskin contain latex?

Friday, November 14th, 2008

Question:

I just need to make sure the moleskins do not have latex. It doesn’t say it anywhere on the package. Can you confirm that they don’t?

Answer:

Hi Lois- Thanks for your interest in our Blister Care products. Our Moleskin is made from cotton fabric coated with a latex-free zinc oxide adhesive.

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Heatsheets Emergency Bivvy or Thermo-lite 2 Bivvy?

Friday, November 14th, 2008

Question:

I live in N.E. Ohio and every Oct. I check and update all of my kits (first aid, winter truck pack and home kit). I have been looking at your two bivvy sleeping blankets for my truck kit. Can you tell me which one works the best in very very cold weather?

Answer:

Cassie, They both work well. The main differences are that the Thermo-Lite bivvy will breathe better – meaning less moisture condensation inside – due to the foot vent opening and Velcro side closures. If you are inside your truck, out of the wind, this would be my choice. The Thermo-Lite bivvy is also made of a stronger material. On the other hand, I like the Heatsheets bivvy because of its weight, size and the waterproof taped seams. Either bivvy will help you spend the unexpected night out in your truck.

Thanks for the question.

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AMK Heatsheets Bivvy Temperature Rating

Wednesday, December 19th, 2007

Q:
Hi Dr. Can you tell me, in degrees F, how an AMK Heatsheets Bivvy would improve the temperature rating for an adventure sleeping bag. I have a sleeping bag which is rated functional to 40 degrees F.

A:
A Heatsheets Bivvy – will add 10 – 15 degrees F. to the temp. rating of your sleeping bag. If you use it on the inside of your bag – plan on a damp night as the material does not breathe. If you put it on the outside of your bag, you will stay drier and warmer, but the outside of your bag will get damp from the condensation. this won’t be a problem if you are using a synthetic bag or a down bag with a water repellent coating on the nylon shell.

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Oral Rehydration Salts

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

Q:
Are the Oral Rehydration Salts good indefinitely? I have had some for several years now. Thanks.

A:
Lamar, There are no expiration dates on the oral rehydration salts. AS long as the package is still sealed you should be good to go.

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