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How to Prevent and Treat Heat Exhaustion and Dehydration

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

thirst

As we move into the heart of summer, it’s wise to remember the risks that high temperatures, sun, humidity and exertion can bring. Regardless of athletic prowess, age, or gender, the weather has an enormous affect on our bodies. Some days it’s better to adjust your plans and explore when the heat is less intense in the early mornings or after the sun has set. Keeping hydrated is key to preventing heat illness. Water is the fuel our bodies need to cool from the inside out

10 Essentials Every Hiker Should Carry

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Lost-Photographer-0540

Headed out on a hike or even a multi-day backpacking adventure? Make sure you plan ahead for emergencies. We’ve assembled a list of the key items you should make room for in your pack.

While it may seem silly to carry them on your short hike, you’ll be grateful for these aids when you might need them.

 

 

 

 

 

The Essential List:

The most important thing you can pack before any adventure is knowledge. Know your abilities, know the area you are traveling and know the weather.

3 Useful & Life Saving Items You Should Take On Your Next Adventure

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Reflection of mountains and trees in water, Moor Lake, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada

3 Insanely Useful & Life Saving Items You Should Take On Your Next Adventure

So you are heading out to explore the Allagash Wilderness of Maine, backpacking in the Sierras or mountain biking an old logging road. You’ve got the gear packed and the posse assembled, but have you thought about the fact that you’ll be 20 miles from a road? That means your crew will be depending upon each other in case something goes down.

Are You #AdventureEquipped?

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan's Dawn Wall

Adventure Medical Kits’ Ambassador Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan’s Dawn Wall

Adventure Equipped

Adjective

  • A state of preparedness when embarking on an adventure big or small.
  • An adventurous person who seeks to push his limits outdoors and is prepared.

We are all adventurous souls. From climbers, to adventure racers, mountaineers and weekend warriors, we live to get outside and explore. We may not know our limits, and we usually push our limits, but what is most important is to be prepared, or what we like to call #AdventureEquipped.

Essential Gear for Getting Out on the Trail with Small Children

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Hikebaby

Heading out on the trail for the first time with small children can be intimidating, whether you are headed for a short hike near or far. We know. That’s why we hike together and count on each other to help bring things we may have forgotten. It’s important to be prepared for emergencies of all kinds.

Remember that being prepared when heading out with a baby is important, but having this stuff isn’t going to save you in an emergency situation! So start by first really prepping for your hike. Know where you are going and what the weather is doing in your area. A hike that once may have been an easy day outing for you can become a much longer journey with a cranky baby on your back.

Lightning Safety

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

lightning strike 3

Incidences of lightning strikes are more common in the Midwest, Gulf Coast, and Atlantic regions of the United States because these regions have thunderstorms more frequently than the rest of the country, as shown in the image below.¹ An estimated 400 lightning injuries occur annually based on data averaged over the last decade.² Lightning danger is no joke or freak accident. The Wilderness and Environmental Medicine Journal has some safety recommendations that can help minimize your risk of a strike if you find yourself outside in a thunderstorm.

lightening

Know the warning signs for thunderstorms:

  • Building Cumulonimbus clouds (pictured below)

Thin Ice: Recognizing and Reacting

Friday, February 8th, 2013

As much emphasis should be placed on avalanche safety, there’s another danger, sometimes unpredictable, to consider during winter expeditions. Ice varies a great deal in strength; accordingly, so too should your choice to cross it.

A number of factors affect the stability of ice. Consider them, and avoid dangerous crossings first and foremost.

·           If you think the water is deep enough to submerse you, or moving fast enough to sweep you underneath it, don’t cross.

·           Snow-covered ice may be thin, as snow insulates the water’s surface, limiting freezing.

Ouch! Burns

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

burn 2Burns unfortunately can be a common injury anywhere from an isolated wilderness campsite to in your comfortable kitchen at home. Yet whether outdoors or at home, to distinguish a minor burn from a serious burn, the three classifications of either first-degree, second-degree or third-degree burn will help determine the appropriate emergency care.

 

1st-degree
The least serious burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin is burned, but not all the way through.

  • The skin is usually red
  • Often there is swelling
  • Pain sometimes is present

Emergency Snow Shelters – Part 2 Snow Coffin

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Our friends at NOLS have put together a great safety tip for snow activities. Casey Pikla has demonstrated to us how to make a snow trench if you get caught unexpectedly outside and need to bunker down for a while.

Walking, skiing, or snowshoeing in a winter wonderland can provide some of the most serene and enjoyable of backcountry ventures. But what happens when that leisurely outing turns into an unexpected night out?

Luckily, the winter environment comes with its own building material: snow! Here’s the quick and easy on a few emergency snow shelters that can protect you from old man winter in a pinch.

Emergency Snow Shelters – Part 1 Snow Trench

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

Our friends at NOLS (National Outdoor Leadership School) have put together a great safety tip for snow activities. Casey Pikla has demonstrated to us how to make a snow trench if you get caught unexpectedly outside and need to bunker down for a while.

 

Walking, skiing, or snowshoeing in a winter wonderland can provide some of the most serene and enjoyable of backcountry ventures. But what happens when that leisurely outing turns into an unexpected night out?

 

Luckily, the winter environment comes with its own building material: snow! Here’s the quick and easy on a few emergency snow shelters that can protect you from old man winter in a pinch.