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What do I do if my dog runs through a barbwire fence and his leg is bleeding?

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016

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Adventure Dog Series-Your Guide to Dog First Aid

Adventuring is always more fun with a dog in tow. And you know your buddy loves the adventure just as much as you do. Yet even tough dogs can get injured out on the trail. Will you know how to take care of your four legged friend? Follow our posts for first aid tips and how to’s. Your dog will thank you! Woof!

What do I do if my dog runs through a barbwire fence and his leg is bleeding?

3 Useful & Life Saving Items You Should Take On Your Next Adventure

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Reflection of mountains and trees in water, Moor Lake, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada

3 Insanely Useful & Life Saving Items You Should Take On Your Next Adventure

So you are heading out to explore the Allagash Wilderness of Maine, backpacking in the Sierras or mountain biking an old logging road. You’ve got the gear packed and the posse assembled, but have you thought about the fact that you’ll be 20 miles from a road? That means your crew will be depending upon each other in case something goes down.

Basic First Aid Skills- How to Treat a Sprained Ankle

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

ankle injury

Adventure Medical Kits Empowers You Series

Heading out into the wilderness can be an amazing experience that allows you to explore remote areas and challenge yourself. As a smart adventurer, you’ve probably already taken the steps to prepare for your journey by bringing along the basics for survival (Food, Water, Shelter, First Aid Kit, extra Clothing ) and knowing the terrain. But anytime you’re a few hours from advanced medical care, you are assuming risk and should be prepared for injuries and illnesses. That’s why it’s good to know some first aid basics. In our Adventure Medical Kits Empowers You Series, we’ve compiled a list of skills and treatments we consider essential for anyone who goes out in the backcountry. Our articles are not a substitute for professional medical training or treatment. We recommend taking a full Wilderness First Aid course for more comprehensive knowledge and seeking professional care as soon possible.

Are You #AdventureEquipped?

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan's Dawn Wall

Adventure Medical Kits’ Ambassador Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan’s Dawn Wall

Adventure Equipped

Adjective

  • A state of preparedness when embarking on an adventure big or small.
  • An adventurous person who seeks to push his limits outdoors and is prepared.

We are all adventurous souls. From climbers, to adventure racers, mountaineers and weekend warriors, we live to get outside and explore. We may not know our limits, and we usually push our limits, but what is most important is to be prepared, or what we like to call #AdventureEquipped.

Essential Gear for Getting Out on the Trail with Small Children

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Hikebaby

Heading out on the trail for the first time with small children can be intimidating, whether you are headed for a short hike near or far. We know. That’s why we hike together and count on each other to help bring things we may have forgotten. It’s important to be prepared for emergencies of all kinds.

Remember that being prepared when heading out with a baby is important, but having this stuff isn’t going to save you in an emergency situation! So start by first really prepping for your hike. Know where you are going and what the weather is doing in your area. A hike that once may have been an easy day outing for you can become a much longer journey with a cranky baby on your back.

Lightning Safety

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

lightning strike 3

Incidences of lightning strikes are more common in the Midwest, Gulf Coast, and Atlantic regions of the United States because these regions have thunderstorms more frequently than the rest of the country, as shown in the image below.¹ An estimated 400 lightning injuries occur annually based on data averaged over the last decade.² Lightning danger is no joke or freak accident. The Wilderness and Environmental Medicine Journal has some safety recommendations that can help minimize your risk of a strike if you find yourself outside in a thunderstorm.

lightening

Know the warning signs for thunderstorms:

  • Building Cumulonimbus clouds (pictured below)

NSP Avalanche Safety Tips – Tip 4

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

This is the last post from our friends at the National Ski Patrol on avalanche safety. To check out more tips, click through to their website.

General rules of the road….iStock_000017996579_Medium

  1. Don’t overlook clues. Evidence of potential avalanche hazards will be there, so pay attention. If you educate yourself and communicate with your companions, you should have the tools needed to make smart decisions in the backcountry.
  2. Try to avoid traveling in the backcountry alone. Also, never leave the group. Otherwise, if you run into trouble, you’ll be on your own.

Altitude Illness – Tips From Dr. Weiss including “When to Worry”

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Excerpt from A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine, by Dr. Eric A. Weiss.

 

A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine

ALTITUDE ILLNESS  (Mountain Sickness)
It is rare to experience altitude sickness below 6,000 feet.  Moderate altitude is between 8,000 and 12,000 feet (2,400 and 3,600 meters), High altitude is between 12,000 and 18,000 feet (3,600 and 5,400 meters), and extreme altitude is over 18,000 feet (5,400 meters).  High altitude illness is a direct result of reduces barometric pressure and concentration of oxygen in the air at high elevations.  Lower pressure make the air less dense, so your body gets fewer oxygen
molecules with every breath.
Prevention
Graded ascent is the best and safest method of preventing altitude illness.  Avoid abrupt ascent to sleeping altitudes greater than 10,000 feet (3,000 meters), and average no more than 1,000 feet (300 meters) of elevation gain per day above 10,000 feet.  Day trips to a higher altitude, with a return to lower altitudes for sleep, will aid acclimatization.  Eat foods that are high in carbohydrates and low in fat, and stay well hydrated.

AMKs’ BPA-Free S.O.L. Survival Water Bottle

Friday, September 4th, 2009

AMKs’ BPA-Free S.O.L. Survival Water Bottle – The Only Bottle That Can Save Your Life Even When It’s Empty!

The recent admission from SIGG that the aluminum bottles it had produced prior to August 2008 contained the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA) has once again put into sharp focus the safety of all water bottles. There is one way, however, you can be sure your next water bottle does not contain BPA or any other potentially harmful chemicals — that’s to select one made from stainless steel, like AMK’s new S.O.L. Survival Bottle.

It’s Tick Season! Learn How To Protect Yourself

Friday, May 29th, 2009

Ugh, it is tick season. As we all know, they are nasty little buggers that carry Lyme Disease and other viruses. Do you know how to protect yourself against ticks?

Download our Tick Field Reference Guide to learn more about:

  • How to protect yourself.
  • How to identify a tick.
  • How to properly remove a tick.
  • What to do if you have been bitten.

Tick Reference Card

Tick Reference Card

(Click image to download)

You can also read our blog about Lyme Disease to learn more.