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Are You #AdventureEquipped?

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan's Dawn Wall

Adventure Medical Kits’ Ambassador Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan’s Dawn Wall

Adventure Equipped


  • A state of preparedness when embarking on an adventure big or small.
  • An adventurous person who seeks to push his limits outdoors and is prepared.

We are all adventurous souls. From climbers, to adventure racers, mountaineers and weekend warriors, we live to get outside and explore. We may not know our limits, and we usually push our limits, but what is most important is to be prepared, or what we like to call #AdventureEquipped.

Essential Gear for Getting Out on the Trail with Small Children

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016


Heading out on the trail for the first time with small children can be intimidating, whether you are headed for a short hike near or far. We know. That’s why we hike together and count on each other to help bring things we may have forgotten. It’s important to be prepared for emergencies of all kinds.

Remember that being prepared when heading out with a baby is important, but having this stuff isn’t going to save you in an emergency situation! So start by first really prepping for your hike. Know where you are going and what the weather is doing in your area. A hike that once may have been an easy day outing for you can become a much longer journey with a cranky baby on your back.

Lightning Safety

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

lightning strike 3

Incidences of lightning strikes are more common in the Midwest, Gulf Coast, and Atlantic regions of the United States because these regions have thunderstorms more frequently than the rest of the country, as shown in the image below.¹ An estimated 400 lightning injuries occur annually based on data averaged over the last decade.² Lightning danger is no joke or freak accident. The Wilderness and Environmental Medicine Journal has some safety recommendations that can help minimize your risk of a strike if you find yourself outside in a thunderstorm.


Know the warning signs for thunderstorms:

  • Building Cumulonimbus clouds (pictured below)

NSP Avalanche Safety Tips – Tip 4

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

This is the last post from our friends at the National Ski Patrol on avalanche safety. To check out more tips, click through to their website.

General rules of the road….iStock_000017996579_Medium

  1. Don’t overlook clues. Evidence of potential avalanche hazards will be there, so pay attention. If you educate yourself and communicate with your companions, you should have the tools needed to make smart decisions in the backcountry.
  2. Try to avoid traveling in the backcountry alone. Also, never leave the group. Otherwise, if you run into trouble, you’ll be on your own.

Altitude Illness – Tips From Dr. Weiss including “When to Worry”

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Excerpt from A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine, by Dr. Eric A. Weiss.


A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine

ALTITUDE ILLNESS  (Mountain Sickness)
It is rare to experience altitude sickness below 6,000 feet.  Moderate altitude is between 8,000 and 12,000 feet (2,400 and 3,600 meters), High altitude is between 12,000 and 18,000 feet (3,600 and 5,400 meters), and extreme altitude is over 18,000 feet (5,400 meters).  High altitude illness is a direct result of reduces barometric pressure and concentration of oxygen in the air at high elevations.  Lower pressure make the air less dense, so your body gets fewer oxygen
molecules with every breath.
Graded ascent is the best and safest method of preventing altitude illness.  Avoid abrupt ascent to sleeping altitudes greater than 10,000 feet (3,000 meters), and average no more than 1,000 feet (300 meters) of elevation gain per day above 10,000 feet.  Day trips to a higher altitude, with a return to lower altitudes for sleep, will aid acclimatization.  Eat foods that are high in carbohydrates and low in fat, and stay well hydrated.

AMKs’ BPA-Free S.O.L. Survival Water Bottle

Friday, September 4th, 2009

AMKs’ BPA-Free S.O.L. Survival Water Bottle – The Only Bottle That Can Save Your Life Even When It’s Empty!

The recent admission from SIGG that the aluminum bottles it had produced prior to August 2008 contained the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA) has once again put into sharp focus the safety of all water bottles. There is one way, however, you can be sure your next water bottle does not contain BPA or any other potentially harmful chemicals — that’s to select one made from stainless steel, like AMK’s new S.O.L. Survival Bottle.

It’s Tick Season! Learn How To Protect Yourself

Friday, May 29th, 2009

Ugh, it is tick season. As we all know, they are nasty little buggers that carry Lyme Disease and other viruses. Do you know how to protect yourself against ticks?

Download our Tick Field Reference Guide to learn more about:

  • How to protect yourself.
  • How to identify a tick.
  • How to properly remove a tick.
  • What to do if you have been bitten.

Tick Reference Card

Tick Reference Card

(Click image to download)

You can also read our blog about Lyme Disease to learn more.

Lyme Disease: The Biggest Health Threat To Outdoor Enthusiasts This Summer

Monday, May 11th, 2009

By Christopher Van Tilburg, MD

I’ve been chomped by a tick multiple times, as have most people who regularly tramp in the outdoors. It’s creepy — the tick drops onto your skin, burrows in painlessly, and sucks. Its anticoagulant can cause tick paralysis, and these arthropods carry all sorts of infections: Colorado Tick Fever (a virus), Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (parasite), Tularemia (a bacteria), and the more commonly known Lyme Disease.

Snake Bites – How to Treat

Thursday, May 7th, 2009

by Eric A. Weiss, M.D. (excerpt from his book,
A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine


There are two classes of poisonous snakes in the United States:

• Pit Vipers (rattlesnakes, cottonmouths [water moccasins], and copperheads) have a characteristic triangular head, a deep pit (heat receptor organ) between the eye and nostril, and a catlike, elliptical pupil.

• Elapids (coral snakes) are characterized by their color pattern with red, black, and yellow or white bands encircling the body. The fangs are short — these snakes bite by chewing rather than by striking.

The Real Dirt on Hand Sanitizers

Thursday, April 30th, 2009

The recent Swine Flu scare, and the subsequent calls of government health officials to use hand sanitizers regularly as a key means of reducing the likelihood of contracting the virus, has reignited the alcohol vs. benzalkonium chloride debate. While alcohol based hand sanitizers with concentration levels above 60% are effective at killing germs, next generation sanitizers containing benzalkonium chloride have been shown to provide protection long after an alcohol based sanitizer evaporates from your skin.

Handclens (the generic name for AMK’s Adventure Hand Sanitizer ), which contains BZK, kills all 3 types of germs: viruses, bacteria and fungi, including Influenza Type A, of which Swine Flu H1N1 is a subtype.