Adventure Medical Kits - Adventure Discussions
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Adventure Medical Kits Athlete Profile: Hilaree O’Neill

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Hilaree Oneill, Southeast Greenland photo:Adam Clark

Hilaree O’Neill, Southeast Greenland; photo:Adam Clark


Hilaree O’Neill — A Life in the Mountains

For Hilaree O’Neill, skiing is the gateway to possibility. She started skiing at age 3 at Steven’s Pass in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She took a leap of faith shortly after graduating from Colorado College and moved to Chamonix, France. In many ways, her five years in Chamonix served as a second round of college in that this where she was introduced to the world of big mountain skiing and climbing.

Are You #AdventureEquipped?

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan's Dawn Wall

Adventure Medical Kits’ Ambassador Kevin Jorgeson free climbing El Capitan’s Dawn Wall

Adventure Equipped


  • A state of preparedness when embarking on an adventure big or small.
  • An adventurous person who seeks to push his limits outdoors and is prepared.

We are all adventurous souls. From climbers, to adventure racers, mountaineers and weekend warriors, we live to get outside and explore. We may not know our limits, and we usually push our limits, but what is most important is to be prepared, or what we like to call #AdventureEquipped.

Essential Gear for Getting Out on the Trail with Small Children

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016


Heading out on the trail for the first time with small children can be intimidating, whether you are headed for a short hike near or far. We know. That’s why we hike together and count on each other to help bring things we may have forgotten. It’s important to be prepared for emergencies of all kinds.

Remember that being prepared when heading out with a baby is important, but having this stuff isn’t going to save you in an emergency situation! So start by first really prepping for your hike. Know where you are going and what the weather is doing in your area. A hike that once may have been an easy day outing for you can become a much longer journey with a cranky baby on your back.

Essentials for Family Camping First Aid

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

It’s summertime! That means it is time to get outside and explore your state and national parks, recreation areas, and favorite campgrounds.  Before you pack up the kids into the SUV,  be sure to review this list of outdoor first aid tips from wilderness safety expert Buck Tilton, who this month joins AMK as a regular blogger. Welcome aboard Buck!

Buck Tilton is AMK's Newest Expert Blogger

AMK's Newest Expert Blogger Buck Tilton

When you pack for a camping trip, a first-aid kit is a mandatory item. Heck, it has been on the list of Ten Essentials ever since the invention of lists. If your gear includes the Adventure Medical Kits’ Day Tripper with the Easy Care First Aid System, you can handle the most common problems—even without advanced first aid training.

Ask the Doc Mailbag Round-Up

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Here are some questions that people reading our blog have submitted recently…

Q: How do I verify the expiration date on your oral rehydration salts?

A: The manufacturer of the oral rehydration salts we use does not include and expiration date on the package, as rehydration salts aren’t classified as a drug by the FDA.  Because this product is fairly inert (unlike a pharmaceutical), I wouldn’t have a problem stocking a packet that was a few years old in one of my own kits.  However, if you are concerned that your product is too old to be used safely, you can contact our customer service department and arrange a replacement.

“Ask the Doc” Mailbag Round-Up for April 2010

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

Q:  used the heatsheets emergency bivvy (3.8 oz). next morning discovered a lot of moisture in the bivvy. this gave rise to an extra cold and damp start to the day. is this a common with the bivvy? many thanks for a small but important bit of kit. it may not seem like the back country but when i am here in northern ireland events can turn bad.

A:  Condensation inside the bivvy is par for the course with this product – since the material itself is not breathable, moisture accumulates fairly rapidly.  This is why we classify the Heatsheets Bivvy as an emergency product – since, in an emergency, it is necessary to preserve heat and get warm at all costs, even if condensation results.

We Don’t Make This Stuff Up….

Thursday, October 29th, 2009


I really love the products you present. There are many to choose from regarding first aid. That is my problem. I am a hunter and fisherman in the state of Alabama and have never strayed from this state in for my hobbies. I know Alabama is not Africa in terms of large carnivores, but I have had some scraps with a wild hog (hawg, in Alabama), and once was pinned by several coyotes. The hog I killed bare handed, not unscathed mind you, and the coyotes I fought off with a homemade spear i fashioned out of my hunting knife and a long branch while in a pine tree. That stuff was funny then after it was over, but now that I am a father I am thinking differently.

Snake Bites – How to Treat

Thursday, May 7th, 2009

by Eric A. Weiss, M.D. (excerpt from his book,
A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine


There are two classes of poisonous snakes in the United States:

• Pit Vipers (rattlesnakes, cottonmouths [water moccasins], and copperheads) have a characteristic triangular head, a deep pit (heat receptor organ) between the eye and nostril, and a catlike, elliptical pupil.

• Elapids (coral snakes) are characterized by their color pattern with red, black, and yellow or white bands encircling the body. The fangs are short — these snakes bite by chewing rather than by striking.

AMK’s Frank Meyer on KGO AM 810’s “On The Go” SF Travel Show

Monday, April 20th, 2009

Adventure Medical Kits’ marketing director Frank Meyer appeared on San Francisco’s KGO AM 810’s “On The Go” Travel Show on Saturday April 18th.

In the first segment Frank discusses with host John Hamiltion the Ultralight Series, the Adventurer, the S.O.L. Pak and other essential gear for camping in Northern California.

In the second segment on KGO AM 810,  Frank talks about the World Travel kit, Ben’s & Natrapel 8 hour insect repellents, AfterBite and other must-pack items relevant for adventure travelers.

Should I Add a Hemostatic Agent to My First Aid Kit?

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009


Do you recommend adding Celox powder to first aid kits? My situation is carrying the master FAK for a crew of 8-10 scouts and adults for 10+ days backpacking at Philmont.

Thanks, Dan


Dear Dan,

I do recommend carrying a “Hemostatic dressing” for adventures like yours where the activities are higher risk and the remoteness of your adventure means professional medical care will not arrive quickly.