Adventure Medical Kits - Adventure Discussions
     Posts Tagged ‘Backcountry Survival’
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What’s in Your Survival Pack?

Friday, April 17th, 2009


I took an Ultralite .5 First Aid kit and added these Adventure Medical Kit items: 1 person HeatSheets Blanket, Signal mirror, Firestarter, & Whistle.

It is compact, fits easily in a pocket and weighs about 7 oz. Plus it looks cool!

My two cents. Kurt


Thanks for the comment Kurt! Our Product Development team loves to hear feedback from our customers about how they use our products.  Keep the ideas coming….

If you have a story or product idea to share with us, you can submit the info using this form.

Navigation Basics: Map and Compass

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Navigation Basics: Map and Compass

Check out these great tips found on

Map and compass in the field

Together they form the first of the time-tested Ten Essentials—map and compass, the indispensible twin tools of navigation. Even in this high-tech GPS era, nothing replaces the value of a magnetized compass, a paper map and the understanding of how both can help you find your way in the wilderness.

Seek Instruction

This article and accompanying videos provide an overview of 2 primary navigational tools, map and compass. But even watching and reading every word will not turn any person into a skilled backcountry navigator.

RSN Picks Up Adventure Medical Kits’ ‘Be Safe’ Videos

Monday, March 30th, 2009

The Resort Sports Network (RSN), a national television network that specializes in creating and distributing outdoor content to America’s premier resorts, has announced it will begin airing AMK’s ‘Be Safe’ video segments starting in April. Hosted by high altitude mountaineer Ed Viesturs, the ‘Be Safe’ vignettes were designed to provide viewers with useful tips on first aid, safety and survival in the outdoors.   Based in Portland, Maine, RSN broadcasts content into 125 mountain and beach destinations across the country. Currently, RSN has affiliates in the following markets:

Your Feedback: How I use my AMK Survival Products

Sunday, March 1st, 2009


My medical background ranges from First Responder, Medical Missionary,HAM Radio Operator and Special Operations Medicine First Responder (Civilian).

I bought several of your Heatsheets Blankets to put into my medical kits and bug out bags.  I have used them and they have not let me down.

I bought your SOL kit and added it to my bug out bag and getting a few more to put into to put into my travel bags.

Thanks for great kits and products.
Jerimiah G.

Survival kit in my hydration pack – best options for under $50?

Friday, January 16th, 2009


What are some good components for a survival kit to put in a medium hydration pack?

Thanks, Zach


When I am going light and space is tight, I carry The Pocket Survival Pak and Heatsheets Bivvy. The Pocket Survival Pak has everything you need but a shelter, hence the addition of the Heatsheets Bivvy. I carry this setup whether I am backcountry skiing in the winter or mountain biking in the summer.


Frank Meyer, Marketing Director/Co-Founder


Heatsheets Blanket as Ground Cover?

Monday, January 12th, 2009

Regarding your Heatsheets and like items, how durable are they?  I was thinking of using them as a ground sheet.  I do ultralight backpacking and it would be a unique option if it was durable enough for more than one use.



Hi James-


Monday, December 29th, 2008

By Christopher Van Tilburg, M.D.

Rescue mission for a lost snowboarder: a bitter-cold, raging midnight storm high above timberline. That was the scene of my first search and rescue call to Oregon’s Mount Hood as a young doctor. After another team located the snowboarder, I scurried from the tempestuous black night to the ski patrol room, where I examined a shivering, huddling young man. He clutched a blanket draped over soaked ski clothes, and held a steaming cup of hot chocolate, too scalding to drink. Fortunately, the snowboarder had been found. But from across the room I could see he suffered from hypothermia and dehydration.

Backcountry Grub: What’s Safe to Eat and Drink?p

Thursday, November 20th, 2008

Dr. Chris VanTilburg


Christopher Van Tilburg, M.D.

In October, a solo climber on Washington’s 12,276-foot Mount Adams fell on Suksdorf Ridge, and broke his ankle. It’s just what every climber fears: being alone on a high mountain with a disastrous injury. Unable to walk, he dragged himself down the snowfields. After five days and nights, he was found at 6,200 feet suffering from frostbite and dehydration. He survived on creek water and an eclectic mix of creepy crawlers: ants, centipedes, spiders, mushrooms, and berries.

Consumer Comment – AMK Thermo-Lite Bivvy

Thursday, October 9th, 2008

Sent to us 4/25/07 from Peter, NY

I wanted to advise you of a recent accident that I had while hiking in Northern New York State. I have attached a news article from the New York State Department of Conservation. The article does not specifically mention one of your products but I want to advise you that it helped save my life. I purchased the Thermo Lite Emergency Bivy Sack at Eastern Mountain Sports, and I stayed in this shelter during my long night out. Please read the article attached and be advised that I truly can say that I was glad that I had this with me. This item along with food and staying hydrated kept my body temperature at 97 degrees for almost 18 hours while I was stuck outside, in temperatures that dropped to -23.

Myth of the Month – Water Treatment

Tuesday, October 7th, 2008

MYTH: You need to boil water for ten minutes to make it safe to drink.

FACT: Any water brought to a boil, even at high altitudes, is safe to drink.