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The Call of Adventure: Preparing for the Palisade Traverse and Beyond

Tuesday, November 13th, 2018

There’s nothing like the call of adventure, especially when it’s calling you to push yourself. Adventurer Kevin McDermott shares how adventure got ahold of his life, where it’s taking him next, and what new gear he’s packing to #BeSafe. – Adventure Medical Kits. 

Working & Playing in the Mountains

Throughout the past five or more years of my life, pushing myself and testing my limits in the mountains has become my biggest passion.  It all began back in the summer of 2012 with my first season working on the AMC professional trail crew in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  Facing endless hours and days of back-breaking labor, sleep deprivation, and suffering in such a harsh and unforgiving environment for two long summers forged me into the adventure-seeker and mountain-lover that I am today.  Since then, I have worked as a professional tree cutter and wildland firefighter for the US Forest Service in both Central Idaho and the Lake Tahoe Region of California, fighting blazing wildfires and running chainsaws for long hours in some of the harshest terrain and conditions imaginable across the western US.

When I wasn’t working hard in the mountains, I was playing hard in the mountains.  I soon found myself tackling serious climbing objectives and major summits in some of the most pristine mountain ranges in the country, from the Sawtooths of Central Idaho and the Tetons in Wyoming, to the Cascades of northern Oregon and Washington.

I fell in love with the exhilarating sport of ice climbing

I also naturally fell in love with the exhilarating sport of ice climbing, facing committing alpine objectives and steep snow/ice climbs throughout the Northeast.  Over the years and through countless adventures, I have come to realize that hard work and mountain climbing are in my blood.

The Drool of the Beast

Earlier this past winter, my friend Kellen Busby and I decided we would test ourselves on a route with one of the toughest ice climbing grades we had attempted to date.  This route is known as ‘The Drool of the Beast’; a fairly short, but very steep and thin ice flow through a narrow chimney of rock, tucked away up in Mad River Notch in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  Joining us on this climb was our new-found friend and climbing partner Joe Miller.

The Drool of the Beast

Making our way a couple of miles up the steep and winding trail, we approached the base of the climb.  Our initial thoughts upon first glance of the route were hesitant at best.  It was definitely steep, and much thinner than we expected.  After a brief period of forethought and reluctant hesitation, Kellen stepped up to the plate ready to face the challenge that lay before us head on.  Kellen made short work of the climb with a level head and skillful movements, and Joe and I hastily followed as the late-morning sun began to heat things up.

Upon descending back to the bottom of the climb, Joe began to talk with us about his work at Tender Corporation, maker of brands including Adventure Medical Kits and Survive Outdoors Longer. The company specializes in designing emergency outdoor equipment such as first aid kits, bivvies, shelters, and various survival tools.  He had also handed us both a S.O.L. bivvy, which Kellen and I had the opportunity to test out as we posed for a photo at the base of the route under the warm sun, lazily lounging in our new favorite survival bivvies.

Enjoying our new S.O.L bivvies

Scheming for an Adventure

As the winter passed into spring, Joe and I fell out of touch.  Kellen, Mac Weiler, and my Idaho friend Mike McNutt and I made an attempt of Mt Rainier in early June.  Though we didn’t make the summit, the trip opened our eyes to the incredible beauty and grandeur of these massive glaciated volcanoes.  Several months after our return, I discovered a couple of posts describing Joe’s recent big mountain adventures on social media.  The first described a technical ascent of Mt Whitney, the tallest mountain in the lower 48, while the second described a trip to high summits of the Wind River Range in Wyoming.  ‘Wow!  These are the kinds of adventures I live for!’ I thought to myself as I gazed in astonishment and pondered the possibilities.  My soul was already hungry for more big mountains to climb.  It wasn’t long before I sent Joe a message about coordinating a trip of our own, and so began the scheming for our next big adventure.

Joe’s ascent up Mt. Whitney had me hungry for a big adventure

Not long after this scheming began, so too did the training.  Miles upon miles of running each week led me to my first ever Spartan Ultra race in September, facing 30+  grueling miles and 60+ soul-crushing obstacles through the hills of Vermont.  Finishing in just over 10 hours, this was perhaps one of the hardest days of my life.  After endless miles of steep hills, mud, cold swims, and relentless obstacles, it took every fiber of my being to push onward to the finish line, even as my body approached the brink of total failure.  As hard as this race was, perhaps it has helped prepare me for even greater challenges yet to come.

The Palisade Traverse

Since my time working for the US Forest Service in the North Lake Tahoe region of California and exploring the High Sierras the previous summer, there was one place in particular that stood out in my mind: the Palisades.  Though I had yet to witness this pristine range of jagged peaks for myself, I knew these mountains were just waiting for Joe, Kellen, and I to answer the call.  Our intended route, the Full Palisade Traverse, ascends six 14,000 foot peaks and traverses the Palisade Crest in its entirety, covering roughly 8 miles and 70,000 feet of elevation gain.

Palisade traverse

The Palisades are calling Joe, Kellen, and I to go

When Adventure Calls

This route will test us, pushing our physical and mental limits harder and further than any challenge we may have experienced thus far (possibly even harder than the Spartan Ultra race).  Not only will we have the physical difficulty of the route to contend with, but the unforgiving elements of this high-elevation environment as well.  We are attempting this route in early November, when the days will be shorter and nights colder. When the sun sets over the horizon and the temperatures begin to drop, I’ll be glad to have my S.O.L. bivvy with me!  Though we hope to find a window of fair weather for the traverse, the possibility for inclement and unpredictable winter weather is certainly there.  The odds seem weighed heavily against us, but to succeed in such an epic challenge would be the ultimate triumph of willpower and endurance.  Regardless of whether or not we do succeed, this climb will prepare us for even bigger mountains and greater challenges going into the future.  When the time comes to answer the call of adventure, we will be ready!

4 Employees. 40 Miles. 13,804 ft. – Preparing for Gannett Peak

Wednesday, June 6th, 2018

Tender Corporation – parent company to brands like Adventure® Medical Kits, Survive Outdoors Longer®, Ben’s®, After Bite®, and Natrapel® – has always existed with a simple, unified goal: to help people enjoy the outdoors safely, even in the most remote locations. This July, Tender Corporation is sponsoring a team of four employees on an ascent up Gannett Peak to share how to prepare and train for a high peak expedition.

The Remote Beauty of Gannett Peak

The Wind River Range in Wyoming

Gannett Peak, located in the Wind River Range of the Rocky Mountains, is the highest mountain in Wyoming at 13,804 ft. and represents a unique mountaineering challenge. The broad, snow-capped summit rests upon a rocky base covered in five glaciers, all nestled in the remote wilderness of the Rockies.

View of Gannett Peak

Infamous for its inaccessibility, Gannett Peak requires the longest round trip approach of any state highpoint, with a minimum of 40 miles covered and a 9,000 ft. vertical climb.

Team Tender

Team Tender has been training for this expedition since January. Over the next month, they’ll be sharing tips on how to safely prepare for a journey of this magnitude, including emergency plans, gear considerations, and training regimens. During their week-long journey, they will be putting medical kits, survival bivvies, and insect protection to the test. They’ll also be posting live updates from the trail (and hopefully the summit!) on social media.

The team includes four employees who will be attempting the climb, as well as ground support from Tender Corporation’s Chief Marketing Officer Frank Meyer, who has previously summited Gannett Peak.

For the latest news during the planning process and live updates from the trail, make sure to follow Adventure® Medical Kits on Facebook and Instagram, as well as the different members of the team on Instagram. The team leaves New Hampshire for Wyoming on July 13th. #TeamTender #BeSafeGannett

Meet Team Tender!

Joe Miller – Trip Leader & Photographer

Instagram: @sir_st33zy

I was drawn to the woods from a young age. As I grew up, I kept finding ways to get closer and closer to the mountains, finally moving full time to the White Mountains of New Hampshire in 2015. In the White Mountains, I quickly bagged all the high peaks, learned the ropes of alpinism, and have since used New Hampshire as a home base for bigger adventures such as Thailand, Banff Canada, and multiple other US climbing destinations.  A Search and Rescue Member, I love adding new skills and experiences to my ever growing arsenal of backcountry travel, and Wind River Range is a must do on any outdoorsman radar. The challenge of bagging the highest peak in Wyoming in such a remote setting is intriguing to me in both a logistical and athletic sense.

Ben Pasquino – Official Mule & Gear Junkie

Instagram: @pasquinob1_nh

Name’s Ben Pasquino, 35 years of age, and I’ve been pushing my limits for my entire life. It just makes logical sense to try my hand at mountaineering. Previously an NCAA swimmer, I became an ultra-marathon runner after college. A CrossFit athlete and coach for nearly 5 years, I’m no stranger to hard work and following training regiments with an end goal in sight. Designated as the mule of the group, I’m stoked to test our fitness and see how far we push ourselves on this adventure up Gannett.

Chelsea Miller – Logistics Guru & Chef

Instagram: @mtnchels

I’m always scheming my next adventure.  Whether it’s this weekend’s hike or an after-work mountain bike ride, I’m constantly daydreaming about my next chance to get outside.  I love trip planning, maps, and lists; after ticking off NH’s 48 4,000 footers, I know the trails of the White Mountains like the back of my hand.  The opportunity to plan a trip to the Wind River Range is unbelievable. I’ve hiked and climbed all over New England and taken a number of trips across the country and the world to hike and climb. Taking on a high peak is an exciting next step on my mountaineering journey. Already, training for this expedition has pushed me past my perceived limits, and I’m excited to see what we’ll be able to accomplish as a team!

Jenny Hastings – Social Media Coordinator

 

Instagram: @jenpen_95

I fell in love with hiking from spending hours in the White Mountains with my dad, where my childhood tendency to dart ahead and scramble unnecessarily over rocks earned me the nickname “Mountain Goat.” As the mountains have gotten bigger as I’ve grown, I’ve been excited to meet each new challenge and reach each new summit. Gannett Peak represents the next step forward for me in my passion for mountains and will be my highest summit to date. At 5’1’’, I’m having to put on some muscle for this trip, but I’m training hard and enthusiastically rising to the challenge. I’m in charge of sharing our adventure with you through social media, and I can’t wait to share our journey and what I learn! As John Muir said – “The mountains are calling, and I must go.”

Frank Meyer – Expedition Coordinator (also our boss!)

Instagram: @ftmeyer50

Over 30 years ago, I co-founded the Adventure® Medical Kits brand to meet the need I saw and personally experienced for medical kits designed for people that are heading into remote locations and have to care for themselves. An avid skier, backpacker, and whitewater kayaker, I have put these first aid kits and other Tender Corporation products to the test both in my native Montana and on mountaineering expeditions, including a trip up Rainier and a previous summit of Gannett Peak with my son’s Boy Scout Venture Crew. I’m excited for Team Tender to experience Wyoming’s Wind River Range and attempt a summit of Wyoming’s highest and glaciated Gannett Peak (13,804′). I am looking forward to the feedback they give from extensive product testing in a range with quite volatile weather.

5 Tips to Prevent Dehydration While Hiking

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

Hiking is a pleasurable pastime and a good way to stay healthy and happy, as it presents ample opportunity to get sunshine, fresh air, and exercise. However, the exertion makes you susceptible to dehydration, which can make a hike less enjoyable and even dangerous.

Staying hydrated is especially important for senior hikers because, on an average, older adults have 10% less fluid in their bodies than younger adults. In addition, seniors also experience a diminished sense of thirst that leads to a reduced fluid intake, making them more susceptible to dehydration. But young or old, each and every hiker needs to stay hydrated before, during, and after a hike in order to be safe.

1. Drink Water before Hitting the Trail

Before embarking on the hike, you should drink one or two cups of water. Your body only begins to feels thirsty when the water level is already low, meaning you shouldn’t wait for the body’s “thirsty” signal before drinking. Instead, keep your water level from dropping in the first place by hydrating pre-hike. Developing habits for long-term hydration in your life will help you be at your fittest and healthiest before going on a hike.

2. Steer Clear of Caffeinated Drinks & Alcohol Prior to a Hike

Planning to hit the trail in the morning? Opt for water instead of soda the night before. A hiker should refrain from or at least limit drinking caffeinated drinks like coffee or cola before a hike, as this can increase your fluid loss.

caffeineted beverages can contribute to dehydration

Avoid caffeinated beverages like coffee before a hike

Consuming alcoholic drinks prior to hiking should be absolutely avoided, as they significantly contribute to dehydration. These drinks are also not great drinks to bring on a hike, as they won’t hydrate you properly and may dehydrate you.

3. Carry Food & Water (& Make Them Easily Accessible)

Any person going on a hiking trip should carry ample food and water. Water keeps you hydrated, while food is the body’s main source of fuel and salts (electrolytes) – you need both to prevent dehydration. Individually wrapped snacks, energy bars, dried food, and bottled water are typically sufficient for a person embarking on a day hike, unless the trip involves meal times. Remember to balance your food intake with fluid consumption to avoid becoming severely ill and dangerously debilitated.

Whether you use a bottle or a bladder, make sure you’re drinking regularly 

For longer, more strenuous hikes, you may also want to pack electrolyte tablets. Sweating causes you to lose electrolytes, which can make hiking more difficult. Adding electrolyte tablets or a sports drink to your pack is an easy way to stay at the top of your game.

Of course, packing water or food alone won’t keep you hydrated and healthy – you have to consume it. Maybe hydration comes naturally to you and you’ll remember to drink, but if you find yourself regularly forgetting, here’s a few ideas that might help:

  • Use a bladder – if you use canteens or bottled water and find yourself forgetting to stop and grab a drink, using a bladder lets you drink on the move with water always easily accessible.
  • Prefer bottles? Pick your pack with care – if you prefer bottles or canteens to a bladder, make sure the hiking pack you use lets you easily reach your water. Some packs have forward-facing pockets that make it easier to pull your bottle out than the traditional side pocket.
  • Keep a few snacks stashed where you can reach them – the hip pocket of your pack is a great place.

4. Drink Water before Feeling Thirsty

You shouldn’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink water, because that means you’re already dehydrated and not performing at the top of your game. You should replenish fluids and electrolytes by drinking one half to one quart of water every hour you’re hiking. You may need to drink more depending upon the temperature and the intensity of the hike.

Hiking in warmer environments increases your water intake needs

For variety, consider alternating between plain water and a sports drink with electrolytes. This will retain fluids, maintain energy, balance electrolyte levels, and thus make hiking more enjoyable.

5. Stay Hydrated after Hiking

Don’t stop drinking when you stop hiking. You should continue to intake fluids even after completing the hike to replenish water and electrolyte loss. Since thirst always underestimates your body’s fluid needs, drink more than you think is necessary.

If Dehydration Strikes

Prevention is always the best treatment, but if you or someone in your party does become seriously dehydrated, make sure you have the first aid supplies and knowledge you need to treat them. Oral rehydration salts are a lightweight addition to your first aid kit that are proven to help your body absorb and retain fluids more effectively. If you’re headed on an extended adventure, adding these to your pack could make a huge difference.

Stay Hydrated & Get Hiking!

A hike, when done correctly and safely, has many medical benefits such as reducing the risk of diabetes, colon or breast cancer, osteoporosis, and heart attacks, as well as decreasing disability risk and increasing overall physical function. More than that though, hiking gives us a sense of adventure and a rush of adrenalin from being amidst nature and discovering new places, all of which is wonderful for mental well-being. To hike successfully and get optimal benefits, though, make sure you stay adequately hydrated to prevent dehydration.