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The Call of Adventure: Preparing for the Palisade Traverse and Beyond

Tuesday, November 13th, 2018

There’s nothing like the call of adventure, especially when it’s calling you to push yourself. Adventurer Kevin McDermott shares how adventure got ahold of his life, where it’s taking him next, and what new gear he’s packing to #BeSafe. – Adventure Medical Kits. 

Working & Playing in the Mountains

Throughout the past five or more years of my life, pushing myself and testing my limits in the mountains has become my biggest passion.  It all began back in the summer of 2012 with my first season working on the AMC professional trail crew in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  Facing endless hours and days of back-breaking labor, sleep deprivation, and suffering in such a harsh and unforgiving environment for two long summers forged me into the adventure-seeker and mountain-lover that I am today.  Since then, I have worked as a professional tree cutter and wildland firefighter for the US Forest Service in both Central Idaho and the Lake Tahoe Region of California, fighting blazing wildfires and running chainsaws for long hours in some of the harshest terrain and conditions imaginable across the western US.

When I wasn’t working hard in the mountains, I was playing hard in the mountains.  I soon found myself tackling serious climbing objectives and major summits in some of the most pristine mountain ranges in the country, from the Sawtooths of Central Idaho and the Tetons in Wyoming, to the Cascades of northern Oregon and Washington.

I fell in love with the exhilarating sport of ice climbing

I also naturally fell in love with the exhilarating sport of ice climbing, facing committing alpine objectives and steep snow/ice climbs throughout the Northeast.  Over the years and through countless adventures, I have come to realize that hard work and mountain climbing are in my blood.

The Drool of the Beast

Earlier this past winter, my friend Kellen Busby and I decided we would test ourselves on a route with one of the toughest ice climbing grades we had attempted to date.  This route is known as ‘The Drool of the Beast’; a fairly short, but very steep and thin ice flow through a narrow chimney of rock, tucked away up in Mad River Notch in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  Joining us on this climb was our new-found friend and climbing partner Joe Miller.

The Drool of the Beast

Making our way a couple of miles up the steep and winding trail, we approached the base of the climb.  Our initial thoughts upon first glance of the route were hesitant at best.  It was definitely steep, and much thinner than we expected.  After a brief period of forethought and reluctant hesitation, Kellen stepped up to the plate ready to face the challenge that lay before us head on.  Kellen made short work of the climb with a level head and skillful movements, and Joe and I hastily followed as the late-morning sun began to heat things up.

Upon descending back to the bottom of the climb, Joe began to talk with us about his work at Tender Corporation, maker of brands including Adventure Medical Kits and Survive Outdoors Longer. The company specializes in designing emergency outdoor equipment such as first aid kits, bivvies, shelters, and various survival tools.  He had also handed us both a S.O.L. bivvy, which Kellen and I had the opportunity to test out as we posed for a photo at the base of the route under the warm sun, lazily lounging in our new favorite survival bivvies.

Enjoying our new S.O.L bivvies

Scheming for an Adventure

As the winter passed into spring, Joe and I fell out of touch.  Kellen, Mac Weiler, and my Idaho friend Mike McNutt and I made an attempt of Mt Rainier in early June.  Though we didn’t make the summit, the trip opened our eyes to the incredible beauty and grandeur of these massive glaciated volcanoes.  Several months after our return, I discovered a couple of posts describing Joe’s recent big mountain adventures on social media.  The first described a technical ascent of Mt Whitney, the tallest mountain in the lower 48, while the second described a trip to high summits of the Wind River Range in Wyoming.  ‘Wow!  These are the kinds of adventures I live for!’ I thought to myself as I gazed in astonishment and pondered the possibilities.  My soul was already hungry for more big mountains to climb.  It wasn’t long before I sent Joe a message about coordinating a trip of our own, and so began the scheming for our next big adventure.

Joe’s ascent up Mt. Whitney had me hungry for a big adventure

Not long after this scheming began, so too did the training.  Miles upon miles of running each week led me to my first ever Spartan Ultra race in September, facing 30+  grueling miles and 60+ soul-crushing obstacles through the hills of Vermont.  Finishing in just over 10 hours, this was perhaps one of the hardest days of my life.  After endless miles of steep hills, mud, cold swims, and relentless obstacles, it took every fiber of my being to push onward to the finish line, even as my body approached the brink of total failure.  As hard as this race was, perhaps it has helped prepare me for even greater challenges yet to come.

The Palisade Traverse

Since my time working for the US Forest Service in the North Lake Tahoe region of California and exploring the High Sierras the previous summer, there was one place in particular that stood out in my mind: the Palisades.  Though I had yet to witness this pristine range of jagged peaks for myself, I knew these mountains were just waiting for Joe, Kellen, and I to answer the call.  Our intended route, the Full Palisade Traverse, ascends six 14,000 foot peaks and traverses the Palisade Crest in its entirety, covering roughly 8 miles and 70,000 feet of elevation gain.

Palisade traverse

The Palisades are calling Joe, Kellen, and I to go

When Adventure Calls

This route will test us, pushing our physical and mental limits harder and further than any challenge we may have experienced thus far (possibly even harder than the Spartan Ultra race).  Not only will we have the physical difficulty of the route to contend with, but the unforgiving elements of this high-elevation environment as well.  We are attempting this route in early November, when the days will be shorter and nights colder. When the sun sets over the horizon and the temperatures begin to drop, I’ll be glad to have my S.O.L. bivvy with me!  Though we hope to find a window of fair weather for the traverse, the possibility for inclement and unpredictable winter weather is certainly there.  The odds seem weighed heavily against us, but to succeed in such an epic challenge would be the ultimate triumph of willpower and endurance.  Regardless of whether or not we do succeed, this climb will prepare us for even bigger mountains and greater challenges going into the future.  When the time comes to answer the call of adventure, we will be ready!