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     Posts Tagged ‘Essential Hiking Gear’

The Best Gear & Tips for Fall Hiking Adventures

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Reflection of mountains and trees in water, Moor Lake, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada

With fall upon us, some of the best hikes are ahead, allowing us to view changing leaves and summit glorious mountain peaks. To help you prepare, we’ve assembled some essential gear guides and timely tips for your hiking adventures.

Know Before You Go

Hiking is one of those things that is best not to “wing-it”. Check out your hike and route before you go. We like the app from Yonder or AllTrails, as they help to identify great hikes and provide maps and travel tips.

Insider Tip: Be sure to let someone know your hiking route and expected return time. If you end up changing your plans be sure to leave a note behind in your car, that way if you don’t show up they’ll know where to begin the search.

Pack It

Carrying your extra clothes, snacks and water take effort. Why not make it comfortable? Choose a pack that fits your back length and storage needs. We like the options from Osprey.

Insider Tip: Pack the heaviest items at the bottom of the pack. Your hips and lower back can accommodate the weight easier and it will keep your center of gravity even.

It’s all in the Boots… and Socks

Nothing ruins a hike more than an ill-fitting pair of boots. Make sure to choose an option that fits your foot and intentions. Boots that are too tight or loose can cause friction on your feet and create blisters. Our favorites from Garmont feature a wide toe box with room for your toes and great traction. Also, leave those cotton socks in the drawer, opt for wicking or wool to keep feet dry and irritation-free.

Got Blisters?- Be sure to pack first aid gear to address hot spots and blisters. We like the Blister Medic with Moleskin and Glacier Gel for on trail treatment. For more tips, check out our blister prevention tips.

Insider Tip: Take the time to break-in your footwear before you head out on the trail. Your feet with thank you.

Hydration is Key

Why is it so important to stay hydrated?

Your body depends on water to survive. Every cell, tissue, and organ in your body need water to work correctly. For example, your body uses water to maintain its temperature, remove waste, and lubricate joints. Water is needed for good health. Make sure to drink water before you go and every 30 minutes out on the trail. Carry an insulated bottle like the one from RevoMax to keep liquids cool all day.

Insider Tip: You know you’re drinking enough fluids when your pee is light colored. Drink more if it’s dark and infrequent. Avoid alcohol and caffeinated beverages as they can increase dehydration. Make sure to check out our primer on preventing dehydration.

Are You Adventure Equipped?

When the unexpected happens, having survival supplies close at hand is key. The Survive Outdoors Longer® Survival Medic is compact, lightweight, and easily slips into a pocket or pack. Inside the ultralight waterproof pouch is an Emergency Blanket, Fire Lite™ sparker, Tinder-Quik™ tinder, Slim Rescue Howler™ whistle, duct tape, and a button compass. With this small kit, you can stay warm, build a fire, and signal for rescue.

Insider Tip: Cell phones are often unreliable out in the woods. Don’t forget to pack extra clothing, food, water, and gear in case you need to signal and wait for help.

After a long hike, relax and enjoy the view at the top!

 

10 Essentials Every Hiker Should Carry

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Lost-Photographer-0540

Headed out on a hike or even a multi-day backpacking adventure? Make sure you plan ahead for emergencies. We’ve assembled a list of the key items you should make room for in your pack.

While it may seem silly to carry them on your short hike, you’ll be grateful for these aids when you might need them.

 

 

 

 

 

The Essential List:

The most important thing you can pack before any adventure is knowledge. Know your abilities, know the area you are traveling and know the weather.

Navigation:

A compass and map of the area you are exploring. If you pack a GPS, always bring along extra batteries or a map/compass as a backup. Not sure how to find your way. Consider a navigation course to learn the skills. REI.COM sells a variety of GPS units including this Garmin.

GPS
Sun Protection:

Up high in the mountains or in harsh desert sun, sunglasses and sunscreen keep your eyes and skin protected from the sun’s rays. A broad rimmed hat works wonders out on glaciated terrain. Try SOL Sunscreens, great for when you’re in the mountains or in the water.

SOL
Insulation:

It might be sunny at the start of your hike but temperature and weather can change in an instant. Be sure to pack an extra layer based upon the worst weather you might encounter. Bonus, bring along a light hat and gloves and you’ll save 20% of your body heat. Try Mountain Hardwear’s Whisper Jacket, it’s light and packs to the size of a baseball.

MH
Illumination:

Carry a headlamp. Repeat, Carry a headlamp! Even if you plan to end your hike by dark, delays can happen, darkness comes quickly and you’ll be able to continue on even in rugged terrain. The Petzl Tika is fit for the job.

Tikka
 

 

First Aid Kit:

Nothing ruins a hike faster than blisters, bee stings, scrapes and cuts. Bring along a first aid kit stocked with supplies you might need. Not sure how to treat ailments? Adventure Medical Kits’ products include pre-labeled pouches and a first aid manual with how-tos.

0125-0290 AMK Ultralight Watertight 9 RT copy
 

 

Fire:

And then Man or Woman had fire. Staying warm and dry is key in the event you get stranded out in the wilderness. Bring along fire cubes or a fire starter kit so you can light a fire easily.

0140-1230 SOL Fire Lite Kit STRT

Multi Tool:
A knife, multi tool and duct tape can be super handy for almost any need. Cutting, fixing and taping are a handy wilderness skill!

Food:
Make sure to carry at least an extra day’s worth of food. We like hearty bars and snacks that are lightweight and packed with fuel.s and map of the area you are exploring. If you pack a GPS, always bring along extra batteries or a map/compass as a backup. Not sure how to find your way. Consider a navigation course to learn the skills. REI.COM sells a variety of GPS units including this Garmin.

Water:
Carry a water bottle or reservoir. We don’t recommend drinking out of streams unless you have a filter or water purifier. Be sure to note water availability. Adults should have about 2 liters of water for a daylong hike. Stay hydrated by drinking water before you begin your hike, small amounts through the day and later refuel post-hike.

Shelter:

Day hikers are most likely to leave this off their list, but they shouldn’t. It could make a huge difference if you need to shelter someone who is hurt or find yourself in a downpour. Consider packing a light tarp, bivvy sack or emergency blanket.

0140-1138_SOL_Emergency_Bivvy_Laid_Out
Other items you may want to consider:

Insect repellent, Blister treatments, whistle and signaling device.

0006-6878-Natrapel-6oz-Eco-Spray-STRT

3 Useful & Life Saving Items You Should Take On Your Next Adventure

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Reflection of mountains and trees in water, Moor Lake, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada

3 Insanely Useful & Life Saving Items You Should Take On Your Next Adventure

So you are heading out to explore the Allagash Wilderness of Maine, backpacking in the Sierras or mountain biking an old logging road. You’ve got the gear packed and the posse assembled, but have you thought about the fact that you’ll be 20 miles from a road? That means your crew will be depending upon each other in case something goes down.

Prepare for anything and get #AdventureEquipped. Channel your inner Scout with a few simple items that could make you the hero if you and your buddies are stranded out in the wilderness. Trust us, you’re friends will thank you for taking these along.

 

The Doctor is in

Accidents can happen. Carry a first aid kit and you’ll be ready for bee stings, punctured wounds, sprained ankles and a host of other emergencies. The Ultralight watertight .9 is an easy take- along filled with all the supplies you’ll need. It even comes with a handy first aid guide and is housed in a waterproof zip lock bag in case your canoe capsizes.

0125-0290 AMK Ultralight Watertight 9 RT copy

A $20 Box Could Save Your Life

Who ever said $20 doesn’t buy anything? Then they haven’t explored the immensely useful items inside the Survive Outdoors Longer Traverse survival kit. Packed into the small tin are essentials like water purification tablets and water storage container, fire starter with flint, emergency blanket and signaling mirror. The box covers the basics of water, shelter, fire and signaling. The Traverse is easy to slip in your bag and weighs about 6 ounces.

0140-1767_SOL_Traverse_STRT

A Knife with a Purpose

About the size of the palm of your hand, the Phoenix incorporates 8+ survival tools into a small pocketknife size multi-tool. The contents include a fixed, serrated and drop point bladed knife, 3-7mm wrench, flat head screwdriver, fire starter and flint striker, LED light and signaling whistle.

 

0140-0838_sol_phoenix_open_light

 

How NOT to Get Stranded Out in The Wilderness

North, South, East, West, you thought you knew where you were going but now you’re lost. Of course, knowing the terrain, watching the weather and knowing how to use your compass is key in the wilderness. Check out these links below to learn the skills, scout the terrain or get a read on the weather.

Learning Map & Compass Skills

http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/blog/2009/04/navigation-basics-map-and-compass/

Learning Wilderness First Aid and Rescue:

NOLS http://www.nols.edu/wmi/courses/wildfirstaid.shtml

REI https://www.rei.com/outdoorschool/wilderness-medicine-classes.html

National Weather Service http://www.weather.gov/