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Heatsheets Bivvies in Action at Eco Primal Quest

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

As the Eco Primal Quest continues – teams are faced with cold temperatures and rain.  Below is an update from the official website with a photo of our Heatsheets Bivvy in action – keeping the teams warm and dry on a cold morning.

Heatsheets Bivvy at Primal Quest

Here’s a photo taken just minutes ago from the checkpoint.

Teams Brace For More Bad Weather!
Posted on 08/19/09 7:53 AM| by Kraig

Wednesday morning brings us another round of incliment weather, as Primal Quest Badlands presented by SPOT stretches into its fifth day. The forecast calls for cooler temperatures today, with rain a distinct possibility. The combination of the two can make for a long, cold, miserable day out on the course.

Product Testimonial – Heatsheets and Thermo-Lite Bivvy

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

Here is a recent testimonial that we received from Travis Macy – a Professional Multisport Athlete, racing for Team Salomon/Crested Butte.

Let us know if you have a similar story to share!

“Two years ago, amidst a hailstorm in the middle of the night, I hunkered down and pulled out my space blanket, only to be showered with little metallic shardes that had once been part of the useless clear sheet I held in my hand. Needless to say, that was a miserable night!

Survival kit in my hydration pack – best options for under $50?

Friday, January 16th, 2009

Question:

What are some good components for a survival kit to put in a medium hydration pack?

Thanks, Zach

Answer:

When I am going light and space is tight, I carry The Pocket Survival Pak and Heatsheets Bivvy. The Pocket Survival Pak has everything you need but a shelter, hence the addition of the Heatsheets Bivvy. I carry this setup whether I am backcountry skiing in the winter or mountain biking in the summer.

BE SAFE,

Frank Meyer, Marketing Director/Co-Founder

ASK YOUR QUESTION – CLICK HERE

AMK Heatsheets Bivvy Donation

Monday, December 22nd, 2008

By Nate Offenberg, Product Manager at AMK

Once in a while, a project comes across my desk that makes me truly happy.  I have to admit – I have a pretty sweet gig here at Adventure Medical Kits.  As AMK’s Product Manager, I get to design the best medical kits and survival tools in the industry and I get to do it with a lot of people who I really like (and I’m not just saying that because they will eventually stumble onto this blog) – it really is a great job.  That said, there are always projects that take the cake, and this project in particular was perhaps the one I am most proud of this year.

Will my sleeping bag fit inside my bivvy?

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

Question: Do you think i could fit a sleeping bag inside your emergency bivy?

AMK Answer:

Ian,

Thanks for your question.

It depends on how big your bag is. Most bags will, however extra long or below zero bags might be a tight fit.

The Heatsheets Emergency Bivvy is non-breathable so if you put a sleeping bag inside of it you would create a bit of condensation and perhaps get the outside of the bag and insulation wet. It would get you out of the weather however, so a little condensation would be a small price to pay. If your bag has a water resistant outer shell this would help kepp your insulation from getting wet.

AVALANCHE AVOIDANCE: TIPS FOR SAFELY ENJOYING RECREATION IN THE BACKCOUNTRY

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

Doug Abromeit - Director of the Forest Service National Avalanche Center


By Doug Abromeit – Director of the Forest Service National Avalanche Center

Avalanches typically kill more people in the mountains in the West than any other natural disaster, and the winter of 2007-2008 was particularly grim. Last year 36 people died – the worst on record. Two of those people were killed by avalanches off of house roofs, one was killed in a ski area and thirty-three were killed doing their thing in the backcountry — snowboarding, skiing, climbing or riding a snowmobile.

Heatsheets Emergency Bivvy or Thermo-lite 2 Bivvy?

Friday, November 14th, 2008

Question:

I live in N.E. Ohio and every Oct. I check and update all of my kits (first aid, winter truck pack and home kit). I have been looking at your two bivvy sleeping blankets for my truck kit. Can you tell me which one works the best in very very cold weather?

Answer:

Cassie, They both work well. The main differences are that the Thermo-Lite bivvy will breathe better – meaning less moisture condensation inside – due to the foot vent opening and Velcro side closures. If you are inside your truck, out of the wind, this would be my choice. The Thermo-Lite bivvy is also made of a stronger material. On the other hand, I like the Heatsheets bivvy because of its weight, size and the waterproof taped seams. Either bivvy will help you spend the unexpected night out in your truck.

AMK Heatsheets Bivvy Temperature Rating

Wednesday, December 19th, 2007

Q:
Hi Dr. Can you tell me, in degrees F, how an AMK Heatsheets Bivvy would improve the temperature rating for an adventure sleeping bag. I have a sleeping bag which is rated functional to 40 degrees F.

A:
A Heatsheets Bivvy – will add 10 – 15 degrees F. to the temp. rating of your sleeping bag. If you use it on the inside of your bag – plan on a damp night as the material does not breathe. If you put it on the outside of your bag, you will stay drier and warmer, but the outside of your bag will get damp from the condensation. this won’t be a problem if you are using a synthetic bag or a down bag with a water repellent coating on the nylon shell.

Emergency Bivvy

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007

Q:
Is it better to put the sleeping bag inside the bivvy, put the bivvy inside the sleeping bag, or ? Please let me know what you think.

A:
Robert, If you use it inside the sleeping bag – you will get clammy and experience the condensation next to your skin. You will also be quite warm. This option will keep your sleeping bag dry. If you use it on the outside it will act as a water and windproof barrier for your sleeping bag and will raise the bag temp. rating by about 15 degrees F. The outside of the bag will get moist, but you will sleep dry. If you are using a down bag with a non waterproof shell than the down could get wet from the condensation and reduce the thermal capacity of the bag. Frank