Adventure Medical Kits - Adventure Discussions
24h-payday
     Posts Tagged ‘Hiking Safety’
« Older EntriesNewer Entries »

What Experts Pack: The Mountain Series Recharged

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

With over 30 years of guiding experience on the world’s greatest mountains, International Mountain Guides (IMG) is the definition of #adventureequipped! IMG guides know how to lead expeditions safely, which is why Adventure® Medical Kits is proud to have partnered with them for over 20 years. We’re excited to share this note we received from them during their Mt. Rainier season, where they’ve been testing out the Mountain Guide Kit from the Mountain Series Recharged. – Adventure® Medical Kits

Mt. Rainier

IMG climbers above the clouds on Mt. Rainier

Tye Chapman here at International Mountain Guides reaching out on behalf of our guides to say “Thank You” to Adventure® Medical Kits for the new med kits they provided this year and their continued support over the years.

Choosing to Be Prepared

With over 50 guides guiding close to 1500 climbers and trekkers on all 7 continents, on over 150 climbs, treks, and expeditions around the globe each year, you can imagine we take the safety of our climbers and guides seriously.  Simply put, that is why we work with Adventure® Medical Kits. There’s no better partner to ensure that our guides and expeditions are fully prepared for medical emergencies.

What We Pack

IMG climbers on summit of Mt. Rainier

IMG climbers on summit of Mt. Rainier

So what are we packing? Well, at the Guide level all of our guides are equipped with the new Mountain Series Mountain Guide Kit. What we like about these kits are the Find It Fast Map and the semi-transparent and secure pocket. These features make it easy to find supplies when we need them.

At the Expedition level, we carry a few different kits depending on the duration of the expedition and number of climbers or trekkers involved. A few examples include the Mountain Series Mountaineer Kit and the Professional Series Expedition, Professional Guide I, and Mountain Medic kits.

Everything We Need & Nothing We Don’t

While it’s impossible to prepare for every possible scenario, Adventure® Medical Kits has spent years dialing these kits in to provide us with exactly what we need, and equally as important in the mountains, nothing we don’t! Thanks for the continued support Adventure® Medical Kits. Although we hope never to need your emergency medical supplies, it’s nice to know you’re there when it counts!

Putting the Mountain Series to the Test

IMG climbers headed up Mt. Rainier

We’re in full swing on Mt. Rainier with climbs coming and going every day now. I’ve heard it many times already this summer, from several of the guides, that the Mountain Guide kits are perfect. They’re so well thought out and are the perfect size for our groups on not only Mt. Rainier but around the world. The kits you sent this spring have already been in Nepal, Russia, Bolivia, Mongolia, Europe, Tanzania, and Alaska with upcoming trips to Mexico, Ecuador, Argentina, Chile, Nepal, and Antarctica to name a few.

IMG Guide Jonathan Schrock is calling in on the radio from the summit of Mt. Rainier as I type this note. After 10 years at IMG, I still love getting that radio call!

Stay safe this summer!

Tye Chapman

International Program Director

www.mountainguides.com

Photo Credits: Austin Shannon, Senior Guide

5 Tips to Prevent Dehydration While Hiking

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

Hiking is a pleasurable pastime and a good way to stay healthy and happy, as it presents ample opportunity to get sunshine, fresh air, and exercise. However, the exertion makes you susceptible to dehydration, which can make a hike less enjoyable and even dangerous.

Staying hydrated is especially important for senior hikers because, on an average, older adults have 10% less fluid in their bodies than younger adults. In addition, seniors also experience a diminished sense of thirst that leads to a reduced fluid intake, making them more susceptible to dehydration. But young or old, each and every hiker needs to stay hydrated before, during, and after a hike in order to be safe.

1. Drink Water before Hitting the Trail

Before embarking on the hike, you should drink one or two cups of water. Your body only begins to feels thirsty when the water level is already low, meaning you shouldn’t wait for the body’s “thirsty” signal before drinking. Instead, keep your water level from dropping in the first place by hydrating pre-hike. Developing habits for long-term hydration in your life will help you be at your fittest and healthiest before going on a hike.

2. Steer Clear of Caffeinated Drinks & Alcohol Prior to a Hike

Planning to hit the trail in the morning? Opt for water instead of soda the night before. A hiker should refrain from or at least limit drinking caffeinated drinks like coffee or cola before a hike, as this can increase your fluid loss.

caffeineted beverages can contribute to dehydration

Avoid caffeinated beverages like coffee before a hike

Consuming alcoholic drinks prior to hiking should be absolutely avoided, as they significantly contribute to dehydration. These drinks are also not great drinks to bring on a hike, as they won’t hydrate you properly and may dehydrate you.

3. Carry Food & Water (& Make Them Easily Accessible)

Any person going on a hiking trip should carry ample food and water. Water keeps you hydrated, while food is the body’s main source of fuel and salts (electrolytes) – you need both to prevent dehydration. Individually wrapped snacks, energy bars, dried food, and bottled water are typically sufficient for a person embarking on a day hike, unless the trip involves meal times. Remember to balance your food intake with fluid consumption to avoid becoming severely ill and dangerously debilitated.

Whether you use a bottle or a bladder, make sure you’re drinking regularly 

For longer, more strenuous hikes, you may also want to pack electrolyte tablets. Sweating causes you to lose electrolytes, which can make hiking more difficult. Adding electrolyte tablets or a sports drink to your pack is an easy way to stay at the top of your game.

Of course, packing water or food alone won’t keep you hydrated and healthy – you have to consume it. Maybe hydration comes naturally to you and you’ll remember to drink, but if you find yourself regularly forgetting, here’s a few ideas that might help:

  • Use a bladder – if you use canteens or bottled water and find yourself forgetting to stop and grab a drink, using a bladder lets you drink on the move with water always easily accessible.
  • Prefer bottles? Pick your pack with care – if you prefer bottles or canteens to a bladder, make sure the hiking pack you use lets you easily reach your water. Some packs have forward-facing pockets that make it easier to pull your bottle out than the traditional side pocket.
  • Keep a few snacks stashed where you can reach them – the hip pocket of your pack is a great place.

4. Drink Water before Feeling Thirsty

You shouldn’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink water, because that means you’re already dehydrated and not performing at the top of your game. You should replenish fluids and electrolytes by drinking one half to one quart of water every hour you’re hiking. You may need to drink more depending upon the temperature and the intensity of the hike.

Hiking in warmer environments increases your water intake needs

For variety, consider alternating between plain water and a sports drink with electrolytes. This will retain fluids, maintain energy, balance electrolyte levels, and thus make hiking more enjoyable.

5. Stay Hydrated after Hiking

Don’t stop drinking when you stop hiking. You should continue to intake fluids even after completing the hike to replenish water and electrolyte loss. Since thirst always underestimates your body’s fluid needs, drink more than you think is necessary.

If Dehydration Strikes

Prevention is always the best treatment, but if you or someone in your party does become seriously dehydrated, make sure you have the first aid supplies and knowledge you need to treat them. Oral rehydration salts are a lightweight addition to your first aid kit that are proven to help your body absorb and retain fluids more effectively. If you’re headed on an extended adventure, adding these to your pack could make a huge difference.

Stay Hydrated & Get Hiking!

A hike, when done correctly and safely, has many medical benefits such as reducing the risk of diabetes, colon or breast cancer, osteoporosis, and heart attacks, as well as decreasing disability risk and increasing overall physical function. More than that though, hiking gives us a sense of adventure and a rush of adrenalin from being amidst nature and discovering new places, all of which is wonderful for mental well-being. To hike successfully and get optimal benefits, though, make sure you stay adequately hydrated to prevent dehydration.

Lost? The First thing You Should Do to Survive

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

1-hiker_overlooking-mountainscape

 

Heading out into the wilderness can be an amazing experience that allows you to explore remote areas and challenge yourself. As a smart adventurer, you’ve probably already taken the steps to prepare for your journey by bringing along the basics for survival and knowing the terrain. But anytime you’re a few hours off the trail or deep in the wilderness, you are assuming risk and should be prepared for potentially life threatening survival situations like getting lost or injured. That’s why it’s good to know some basic skills you can draw on when the going gets rough.

Taken from Wilderness First Aid and Survival download By Eric A. Weiss M.D. and Adventure® Medical Kits

First Rule of Survival: STOP TO SURVIVE

Stop sign

 

If you find yourself lost, hurt or in a survival situation, take a deep breath, try to relax, and remain calm. Don’t Panic

Use the acronym: S-T-O-P

S-Stop:

Do not travel farther until you assess your situation.

T- Think:

Should I stay here or move? What is the likelihood that I will be found here? How far am I physically able to travel?

O-Observe:

Look around and determine whether you can obtain shelter, water, and fuel for a fire at this location.

P- Plan:

Decide what you should do and take action. Staying put may be the best choice, especially if someone knows where to look for you.

If you’ve decided to sit tight and wait for help, this is a great time to start signaling for assistance.  We’ll cover how to signal for help in more detail in our next survival skills installment but consider adding a whistle to your gear. Many packs, like the ones from Deuter USA come standard with a whistle built into the chest strap. Or purchase this one and hang it from your pack.

The sound of a whistle will travel much further than your voice. Three sharp blasts at regular intervals is the standard distress signal. While you’re whistling, think about how you can make a shelter, find some water and get a fire started so can stay warm in the event of an overnight.

Other Survival Tip

A. Leave a detailed trip itinerary with someone you trust*

B. Never forget that your brain and your ability to remain calm and not to panic are your most important survival tools.

C. Make sure your personal survival kit is waterproof, compact and fairly lightweight, so you will carry it always like the Hybrid 3 Kit from Survive Outdoors Longer

D. Know how to use each and every item in your kit. Don’t wait till you need it. Adjust your kit to fit the appropriate outdoor environment that you are venturing into. (Mountains, desert, wet conditions, cold climate)

How to Prevent & Treat Blisters

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

Did you know blisters are one of the most common injuries in the outdoors and the most common injury for hikers? Within hours, a small rub in your boots can turn into a painful blister. However, with a few basic preventions tricks and early treatment, you can protect your feet and keep a blister from interrupting your adventure.

 

blister on foot

Blisters are the hiker’s #1 injury

Blister Prevention

To keep blisters from developing in the first place, eliminate as many contributing factors as possible. Simple actions taken before you hit the trail and once you’re on the trail can make a huge difference.

Before You Hit the Trail

The first step in preventing blisters it to make sure the gear you’re putting on your feet isn’t causing the problem. Here’s five steps you can take before you hit the trail to stop blisters in their tracks:

  1. Make sure your shoes fit properly. If your shoes are too tight you’ll have pressure sores, while shoes that are too loose lead to friction and irritation. Outdoor retailers like REI often will be able to measure your foot and help you find the right size using a calibrated fit device. A good check you can do yourself though is to pull the insoles out of your shoes and stand on them. You should have a thumb’s width of clearance between the end of your toes and the insole. You want that extra space in the front of the boot so you don’t end up jamming your toes against the toe box on the way down.
  2. Choose your socks with care. As a rule, avoid cotton socks and opt for water-wicking materials like merino wool or synthetics. Everyone has unique feet, making it important to find what works for you and your boots. Sock height, cushioning, and fit all contribute to giving your feet the best in-shoe experience. REI gives some great advice on choosing the sock that’s right for you.
  3. Break new boots in. Even the right footwear can still cause blisters if you don’t break it in. Before heading out on a trip, make sure to spend some time in your new boots, ideally while wearing the socks you’ll use on the trip. You might look funny walking around your home or the office in hiking boots, but your feet will thank you later. Once you’re ready to hit the trail, best practice says start with a short hike – you don’t want to find out you didn’t break them in enough when you planned a 15 mile day.
  4. Avoid prolonged wetness. Moisture breaks down your skin and predisposes it to blistering (that’s why choosing the right sock is so important). Keep your feet dry, and pack an extra pair of socks so if you’re first pair get wet (those mountain streams are everywhere), you can swap out for a dry pair right away.
  5. Protect problem areas. No one knows your feet like you do – if you are prone to blisters in a certain area, be proactive about protecting that area from harm. Before hiking, apply moleskin to sensitive areas where blisters are likely to occur. The moleskin will reduce the friction against your skin, effectively stopping blisters and hot spots before they can even start.

Even if you put moleskin on your feet before setting out, it’s always important to pack more in case the unexpected occurs. If you are prone to nasty blisters, consider adding GlacierGel to your first aid kit as well, as the hydrogel dressing is ideal for stopping the pain from and protecting fully-formed blisters. The Blister Medic contains both moleskin and GlacierGel, making it a lightweight addition to your pack that keeps you prepared. Make sure to go through your first aid kit before setting out to make sure you don’t need to re-stock blister items

On the Trail

Once you hit the trail, there are still things you can do to prevent blisters. Hot spots are sore, red areas of irritation that develop into blisters if allowed to progress. Identifying hot spots early to stop them from becoming blisters will save you miles of pain.

The key message? Pay attention to your feet. It’s easy to ignore slight irritations or brush them off in order to avoid having to stop on the trail, but take our word on it: you don’t want to ignore hot spots. If you think you feel a hot spot, take the time to stop and address it sooner than later.

Treating Hot Spots

If you catch a hot spot early on, you can easily stop it from becoming a blister by covering it with a small piece of moleskin.

covering a hot spot with moleskin

Treat small hot spots by covering them with moleskin, which is included in the Hiker kit

For more irritated hot spots, you can cover them with GlacierGel or use moleskin. Whichever you use, make sure to prep the surrounding skin using an alcohol wipe for maximum adhesion. If you use moleskin, make sure to grab a donut-shaped piece (you can get them pre-shaped here or simply cut a small hole in the center of a rectangular piece).

Position the moleskin so the hole is over the hot spot, making sure the adhesive surface isn’t touching the irritated skin. This raises the area around the hot spot, preventing further rubbing. If necessary, you can secure the moleskin in place with medical tape from your medical kit.

Blister Treatment

Sometimes blisters occur despite our best efforts. Properly treating the blister can help minimize pain and further damage to the area.

For Small Blisters

If the blister is still intact, do not puncture or drain it. Instead, follow the same steps outlined above on treating serious hot spots by protecting it with GlacierGel or moleskin. If you’re using moleskin, you may need to use several layers, as the moleskin doughnut needs to be higher than the blister to be effective.

moleskin doughnut on blister

You may need to use several layers of moleskin to get above the blister

For Large or Ruptured Blisters

If the blister is large but intact, puncture it with a clean needle or safety pin at its base and massage out the fluid. The fluid contains inflammatory juices that can delay healing.

Once you’ve punctured the blister (or if you’re dealing with one that’s already ruptured), trim away any loose skin from the bubble and clean the area with an antiseptic towel or soap and water. You should then apply antibiotic ointment and cover the area with a non-adherent dressing or GlacierGel to prevent contaminants from entering the wound and to promote healing.

applying glaciergel

GlacierGel dressings help protect and heal ruptured blisters

You can then use moleskin (or molefoam) to protect the wound from further rubbing. Use a doughnut-shaped moleskin to raise up the area around the blister – remember to use enough layers to raise the moleskin above the height of the blisters with its dressing. Secure the moleskin in place with medical tape.

You’ll want to change the dressing every day and keep a close eye on it for infection. Signs of infection include redness, swelling, increased pain, or a cloudy fluid under the dressing. If infection occurs, remove the dressing and allow the area to drain. Consult a doctor as soon as you are able.

  • Trim away any loose skin from the bubble and clean the area with an antiseptic towel or soap and water.
  • Apply antibiotic ointment and cover with a non-adherent dressing or other dressings like Glacier Gel.
  • Utilize Moleskin to protect the area. Take a small piece of moleskin and cut a circle in the center approximately the same size as the area.
  • Center the oval over the hot spot and secure into place with tape. This will act as a buffer against further rubbing. Change the dressing every day.
  • Inspect the wound daily for infection-this includes redness, swelling, increased pain, or cloudy fluid under the dressing. If infection occurs, remove the dressing and allow the area to drain. Consult a doctor as soon as you are able.

Gluing a Blister

If you are far from help and must continue walking for an extended period of time, an alternative treatment is to glue the blister in place. This method is initially painful but can be effective in backcountry scenarios, especially if you’re low on typical blister first aid supplies.

Begin by draining the blister of fluid. Then, place a small amount of tincture of benzoin (or glue if that’s all you have) in the drained blister. Press the loose skin overlying the blister back into place and cover the site with a suitable dressing (if you have nothing else, duct tape can work). The extreme pain produced by the benzoin on your skin will only last a few minutes.

glueing blisters

Tincture of benzoin is included in the Ultralight/Watertight .7 kit

Hitting the Trails With Your Kids: Tips to Foster Their Love of the Outdoors

Monday, July 18th, 2016

533978_10151499113555357_2096366940_n

Hitting the Trails With Your Kids: Tips to Foster Their Love of the Outdoors

By Heather Gannoe

To some of us, being in the woods, on the trails, or at the summit of a mountain is the most peaceful, magical place we can dream of. As parents, we naturally want our kids to experience and be part of that same magic, as well as develop their own love for the great outdoors. Before my kids could even walk, I dreamt of the day I could take them on adventures or out running with me. In that daydream, we all smiled from ear to ear, the sun beaming down on our faces between the trees, as we all happily gallivanted through the woods.

Ten years later, my kids and I are indeed gallivanting through the woods, but it isn’t always happy and full of smiles. The truth is, teaching your kids to love the outdoors, or enjoy hiking or trails running, can be an adventure in and of itself. But with these tips you can help foster a love of the trails in your children, and hopefully elicit far more smiles than “are we there yet?” complaints.

Start small. If it’s your child’s very first trail run or hike, don’t expect them to go out and cover a 10K or technical mountain pass. Think of them as a brand new runner or hiker, and gradually increase distance and time on feet accordingly. Start with shorter, easy to bail out on, trails. If you are running, have the kids run in intervals, in order to give them plenty of walk breaks. Little kids are resilient, but they are not immune to overuse injuries, just like the rest of us.

1009872_10152938333355357_2029756114_n

Be Patient & Ditch Time Constraints. This should absolutely be the golden rule of hiking and trail running with little ones. Kids have little legs. They tire easy. They are also easily distracted. A short summit that may typically take you an hour, might take two or three hours if you have little ones in tow. Be understanding of the fact that physically, it’s going to take little ones longer than you to cover the same distance.

Further, remember that kids are full of wonder and curiosity. Don’t be frustrated if your little one wants to stop every 200 yards to look at a mushroom or some moss. Foster and encourage their curiosity, and remember that the great outdoors IS mother nature’s classroom.

Make Them a Part of the Adventure. Kids will feel less “dragged along for the ride” and more a part of the adventure if you give them an active role. Let them carry their own gear in a kid sized backpack or hydration pack. Further, make them feel extra important by letting them carry a vital piece of equipment, such as their own compass or a small first aid kit. Let them help plan the route, and leave them in charge of looking out for and following trail blazes. (Of course, quietly keep an eye out yourself. Because as mentioned above, kids are easily distracted).

Vereen-Gardens-Trail-Blazes

Hydration and Nutrition Matter. We all know the importance of fueling and hydrating while hiking or running. And while kids are awesome at listening to their little bodies when it comes to thirst and hunger, the excitement of being outdoors, plus the added caloric burn of a big hike, may result in an inadvertent blood sugar crash and burn. Remind them frequently to drink and eat when needed.

The Right Gear Matters Too. I know, outdoor gear can be an expensive habit. But with kids, it doesn’t have to be. You don’t have to buy the same high-end labels and name brand hiking pants or running shorts that adults love to wear, but you do want to make sure your kids are comfortable. Sweat wicking, technical fabric always wins over cotton, and mini, inexpensive versions can be purchased at both sporting goods stores and big name departments stores. Or better yet, check your local second hand kids shop, as kids often grow out of clothing so fast, you can buy like-new-gear at a fraction of the cost. Dress them in the same manner you would dress yourself based upon the trail conditions, with layers if needed. Make sure your kids have on appropriate trail running sneakers or hiking boots that fit properly.

Apply Skillful Distraction Methods, if necessary. You know, the kinds of distraction methods you acquire the second you become a parent. Little legs tired? Check out that toad! Cries of “I’m boooreeed!”? Create a scavenger hunt! Sing songs, play “I spy”, make it fun, so the kids forget the monotony that sometimes accompanies walking or running for long distances.

And most importantly:

Encourage, encourage, encourage. Resist the urge to tell your fully capable ten year old that he is moving slower than a 90 year old with a walker. On a serious note, tell them how impressed you are that they are tackling such a big adventure. Positive reinforcement works far better than the alternative…especially when you have made it past the halfway point. Play along when you reach the summit and they believe they are now on top of the world, because in their little minds, they truly are.

Encourage the adventure…one day they will thank you.

Heather Gannoe, is an ACSM certified Exercise Physiologist who splits her time between working as a personal trainer and running coach, and writing as a blogger and author in the fitness and running industry.   She’s also a mom to two young boys, and is constantly encouraging them to love the great outdoors a little more, and their video games a little less.  Trail running really long distances is her true love, but she’ll never turn down an adventure.  Keep up with her adventures on www.RelentlessForwardCommotion.com.

Finding Water in the Wild – Survive Outdoors Longer Survival Tips

Saturday, July 16th, 2016

A male hiker refreshes with a drink of water while standing next to a river in a tropical jungle.

SURVIVE OUTDOORS LONGER- Survival Skills to know if your adventure turns into a misadventure.

Anytime you’re a few hours off the trail or deep in the backcountry, you are assuming risk and should be prepared for potentially life threatening situations like getting lost or injured. That’s why it’s good to know some basic outdoor survival skills. Follow our series for the Water, Fire, Shelter and Signaling tips you’ll need to survive.

Taken from Wilderness First Aid and Survival download By Eric A. Weiss M.D. and Adventure® Medical Kits

Finding Water in the Wild

In an emergency situation, you can live about 3-5 days without water. If survival forces you to drink from a stagnant or muddy pool, remember that is it better drink dirty water than to die of dehydration. Strain muddy water through a cloth or water-purifying filter if you have one.

Thirst is a poor indication of dehydration. Do not wait until you are thirsty to drink. Drink plenty of water wherever it is available. If water is not available, it is best not to eat as the body needs fluids to process and breakdown food.

Look for water in low lying areas or a depression. In dry areas, plants with plenty of green leafy growth indicate a water source. Dig down a few feet and wait for water to accumulate in the pit.

Collect rainwater in your survival blanket and channel it into a container

Do not eat un-melted snow or ice. Your body gives up heat to melt the snow or ice and your mouth can swell and can prevent you from eating and drinking.

Do not drink seawater, alcohol or urine

WAtersill

Make a solar sill:

  • Did a hole about 3 feet wide and 2 ½ feet deep in a low area with good sun exposure.
  • If available, place green, leafy vegetation in the hole to increase the moisture content.
  • Place a wide mouthed container on the bottom of the hole.
  • Cover the hole with your survival blanket so that it dips down toward the center of the hole.
  • Secure the blanket with sand and dirt so there is an airtight seal.
  • Center a small rock in the middle of the blanket over the container. Water will condense on the underside of the blanket and drop into the container.

How to Prevent and Treat Heat Exhaustion and Dehydration

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

thirst

As we move into the heart of summer, it’s wise to remember the risks that high temperatures, sun, humidity and exertion can bring. Regardless of athletic prowess, age, or gender, the weather has an enormous affect on our bodies. Some days it’s better to adjust your plans and explore when the heat is less intense in the early mornings or after the sun has set. Keeping hydrated is key to preventing heat illness. Water is the fuel our bodies need to cool from the inside out

Sweating is the main source of cooling the body during exertion and warm conditions. When you’re overheated, the blood vessels near the skin dilate so that more blood can reach the surface and dissipate heat. If you’ve waited too long to drink water and have become dehydrated, the body is limited in its ability to sweat and evaporate heat.

Read on to learn how to address heat-related illnesses and how you can prevent them on your next outing. And Always grab a first aid kit and basic survival gear so you’ll be ready and #AdventureEquipped.

Basic first Aid Skills- Heat Exhaustion and Heatstroke

Taken from Adventure Medical Kits’ Wilderness & Travel Medicine Guide By Dr. Eric A. Weis

Heat Exhaustion

Signs and Symptoms

Typical symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

  • Flu-like symptoms (weakness, malaise, headache, nausea and loss of appetite)
  • Vomiting
  • Dizziness upon standing or a laying position
  • Dehydration
  • Elevated core temperature(usually below 104F
  • Sweating

Treatment

  • Stop all exertion and move patient to cool and shaded area
  • Remove restrictive clothing
  • Administer water and oral rehydration solutions
  • **Ice or cold packs, if available, should be placed alongside the body, under armpits and on the groin area. Don’t place ice packs directly on the skin as they may induce frostbite. Protect the skin by buffering the skin with a cloth.
  • Additional cooling methods include submerging the patient in cool water or wetting the skin with cold water and fanning the patient.

When should you worry?

Heatstroke

Heat exhaustion that is not treated can progress into Heatstroke, which is a life-threatening medical emergency. Anyone suffering from a heat illness that begins to show altered mental states (loss of coordination, bizarre behavior, confusion) should be treated for heatstroke with rapid cooling and transported to the hospital.

Signs and symptoms:

  • Elevated temperature (above 40C/105F)
  • Altered mental state
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Low blood pressure
  • Rapid respiration
  • Sweating present but may be absent in some cases

Treatment:

  • Cool the victim as quickly as possible, using methods noted above**
  • Do not give the victim anything to drink because of the risk of vomiting.
  • Do not administer acetaminophen or aspirin
  • Treat for shock-keep the victim lying down, covered and insulated from the ground. Elevate the legs so that gravity can improve blood circulation to the heart and brain.
  • Evacuate the victim to the closest medical facility

Prevention:

Keep yourself hydrated.

Dehydration is the most important contributing factor leading to heat illness. Thirst is a poor indication of dehydration. Do not wait until you are thirsty to drink. During exercise your body can easily sweat away 1-2 Liters( 1-2 quarts) of water per hour. Refuel with at least .5 Liters water every 20 minutes throughout the day to insure you’re adequately hydrated. In some cases, you may need more water. The best way to tell if you are hydrated is by urine color. Clear to pale yellow urine indicates you’re drinking enough. Dark, yellow colored urine indicates dehydration (Note: some medications and vitamins can turn urine yellow/orange)

Exercise in the early morning or late afternoon when the sun is low and the heat is less intense. The potential for developing heat illness is greatest when the temperatures are above 35C/95F and the humidity level is over 80%.

Allow yourself adequate time to acclimatize before exercising for prolonged periods in the heat. It takes the body about 10 days to become acclimatized to a heat environment.

Wear clothing that is lightweight and loose-fitting for ventilation and light-colored to reflect heat.

Get plenty of rest. A U.S. Army study found a correlation between lack of sleep, fatigue and heat illness.

Avoid certain medications and drugs like antihistamines, anti-hypertension drugs etc. They can predispose you to heat illness.

10 Essentials Every Hiker Should Carry

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Lost-Photographer-0540

Headed out on a hike or even a multi-day backpacking adventure? Make sure you plan ahead for emergencies. We’ve assembled a list of the key items you should make room for in your pack.

While it may seem silly to carry them on your short hike, you’ll be grateful for these aids when you might need them.

 

 

 

 

 

The Essential List:

The most important thing you can pack before any adventure is knowledge. Know your abilities, know the area you are traveling and know the weather.

Navigation:

A compass and map of the area you are exploring. If you pack a GPS, always bring along extra batteries or a map/compass as a backup. Not sure how to find your way. Consider a navigation course to learn the skills. REI.COM sells a variety of GPS units including this Garmin.

GPS
Sun Protection:

Up high in the mountains or in harsh desert sun, sunglasses and sunscreen keep your eyes and skin protected from the sun’s rays. A broad rimmed hat works wonders out on glaciated terrain. Try SOL Sunscreens, great for when you’re in the mountains or in the water.

SOL
Insulation:

It might be sunny at the start of your hike but temperature and weather can change in an instant. Be sure to pack an extra layer based upon the worst weather you might encounter. Bonus, bring along a light hat and gloves and you’ll save 20% of your body heat. Try Mountain Hardwear’s Whisper Jacket, it’s light and packs to the size of a baseball.

MH
Illumination:

Carry a headlamp. Repeat, Carry a headlamp! Even if you plan to end your hike by dark, delays can happen, darkness comes quickly and you’ll be able to continue on even in rugged terrain. The Petzl Tika is fit for the job.

Tikka
 

 

First Aid Kit:

Nothing ruins a hike faster than blisters, bee stings, scrapes and cuts. Bring along a first aid kit stocked with supplies you might need. Not sure how to treat ailments? Adventure Medical Kits’ products include pre-labeled pouches and a first aid manual with how-tos.

0125-0290 AMK Ultralight Watertight 9 RT copy
 

 

Fire:

And then Man or Woman had fire. Staying warm and dry is key in the event you get stranded out in the wilderness. Bring along fire cubes or a fire starter kit so you can light a fire easily.

0140-1230 SOL Fire Lite Kit STRT

Multi Tool:
A knife, multi tool and duct tape can be super handy for almost any need. Cutting, fixing and taping are a handy wilderness skill!

Food:
Make sure to carry at least an extra day’s worth of food. We like hearty bars and snacks that are lightweight and packed with fuel.s and map of the area you are exploring. If you pack a GPS, always bring along extra batteries or a map/compass as a backup. Not sure how to find your way. Consider a navigation course to learn the skills. REI.COM sells a variety of GPS units including this Garmin.

Water:
Carry a water bottle or reservoir. We don’t recommend drinking out of streams unless you have a filter or water purifier. Be sure to note water availability. Adults should have about 2 liters of water for a daylong hike. Stay hydrated by drinking water before you begin your hike, small amounts through the day and later refuel post-hike.

Shelter:

Day hikers are most likely to leave this off their list, but they shouldn’t. It could make a huge difference if you need to shelter someone who is hurt or find yourself in a downpour. Consider packing a light tarp, bivvy sack or emergency blanket.

0140-1138_SOL_Emergency_Bivvy_Laid_Out
Other items you may want to consider:

Insect repellent, Blister treatments, whistle and signaling device.

0006-6878-Natrapel-6oz-Eco-Spray-STRT

My Dog Got Sprayed by a Skunk! Now what do I do?

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016

IMG_1018

Adventure Dog Series-Your Guide to Dog First Aid and Other Dog Disasters

Adventuring is always more fun with a dog in tow. You know your buddy loves adventure just as much as you do. Sometimes, unknowingly, our best buddies can put themselves at risk. Follow our posts for first aid tips and how to’s. Your dog will thank you!

My Dog Got Sprayed by a Skunk! Now what do I do?

Taken from Dr. Sid Gustafson, DVM  (Author of Canine Field Medicine and a consultant for Adventure Medical Kits’ Adventure Dog Kits

Skunks are a common and generally not a serious threat to active dogs. A direct hit to the face can irritate the eyes.

 

 

 

Action:

  • Keep the dog outside to clean them.
  • Wear gloves and old clothes!
  • Restrain as appropriate. Due to pain, injured or ill animals can be unpredictable. To prevent injury to yourself and others, it is recommended that you restrain the dog as appropriate. Wrap the dogs muzzle with a cloth to prevent nipping and to keep the dog calm.
  • If your dog was hit in the head, use a stream of sterile saline solution to bath the eyes
  • Bathe the animal daily for up to 7 days in the following recommended solution:
  • Skunk Bath Remedy
    • 1 pint 3% hydrogen peroxide
    • 1 Quart Water
    • ¼ cup baking soda
    • 1 Tbsp. Prell liquid dish soap
    • Apply mixture to coat and let sit 30 minutes.
    • Rinse with a mixture of one cup baking soda in one gallon of water. Avoid the dog’s eyes. Do a final rinse with warm water.
  • Skunk spray is composed of thiols, which are responsible for the odor. These are neutralized by the hydrogen peroxide and absorbed by the baking soda.
  • Smell may linger for days or weeks after a skunk incident. Over time your buddy will smell as fresh as a daisy!
  • Be sure to consider rabies, and make sure your dog is vaccinated. Skunks are the primary carriers of rabies in many regions.

At Adventure Medical Kits we’ve got you covered. We’ve curated essential first-aid kits to help keep the guesswork out of what you should pack—as well as keeping costs down by minimizing the amount of items you have to buy. Our dog-specific kits include key items you’ll need for the most common injuries and also include a handy first aid handbook and reference manual to guide you through treating dog injuries and illnesses.

 

0135-0115 AMK Trail Dog_LT

 

Basic First Aid Skills- How to Treat a Sprained Ankle

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

ankle injury

Adventure Medical Kits Empowers You Series

Heading out into the wilderness can be an amazing experience that allows you to explore remote areas and challenge yourself. As a smart adventurer, you’ve probably already taken the steps to prepare for your journey by bringing along the basics for survival (Food, Water, Shelter, First Aid Kit, extra Clothing ) and knowing the terrain. But anytime you’re a few hours from advanced medical care, you are assuming risk and should be prepared for injuries and illnesses. That’s why it’s good to know some first aid basics. In our Adventure Medical Kits Empowers You Series, we’ve compiled a list of skills and treatments we consider essential for anyone who goes out in the backcountry. Our articles are not a substitute for professional medical training or treatment. We recommend taking a full Wilderness First Aid course for more comprehensive knowledge and seeking professional care as soon possible.

Basic First Aid Skills- How to Treat a Sprained Ankle

Taken from Adventure Medical Kits’ Wilderness & Travel Medicine Guide, By Dr. Eric A. Weiss

There you are, just hiking along the trail when suddenly the footing changes and you roll your ankle to one side. You feel it stretch and maybe even feel it tear. It stops you cold and it hurts.

SPRAINS

A sprain is stretching or tearing of ligaments that attach one bone to another. Ligaments are sprained when a joint is twisted or stretched beyond its normal range of motion. Most sprains occur in the ankle and knee.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms include tenderness to the site, swelling, bruising, and pain with movement. Because these symptoms are also present with a fracture, it may be difficult to differentiate between the two. Use caution and treat the injury until x-rays or further medical evaluation is available.

Treatment

  1. First aid begins with R-I-C-E (see below). If the victim cannot bear weight at all, use a splint to stabilize the foot and ankle and get assistance out of the backcountry.
  2. If the victim can still walk, use a C-Splint,  compression wrap or tape the ankle for support.
  3. Continue R-I-C-E-S for at least 72 hours following an injury and administer a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as Ibuprofen, 3x per day with food to reduce pain and inflammation.
  4. As soon as possible, seek medical evaluation to determine the need for X-rays to check for fracture.

A leg tensor bandage being applied outdoors

R-I-C-E-S- Immediate steps for treating sprains and strains

Rest: Resting takes the stress off the injured joint and prevents further damage.

Ice: Ice as quickly as possible as it will reduce the swelling and pain. Apply an ice pack or cold compress to the area for up to 20 minutes, 3-4 times per day. Follow with a compression bandage. Wrapping is key, as the joint will swell as soon as the ice is removed.

Compression: Compression wraps prevent swelling and provide support. Pad the injury with socks or soft items, and then wrap with an elastic bandage. Begin the wrap at the toes and move up the foot up and over the ankle with the wrap. The wrap should be comfortable but not too tight. If the victim experiences numbness, tingling or increased pain, loosen the wrap.

Elevation: Elevate the injury above the level of the heart as much as possible to reduce swelling.

Stabilization: Tape or splint the injured area to prevent further damage.

Next Steps:

Continue R-I-C-E-S for at least 72 hours following an injury and administer a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as Ibuprofen, three times per day with food to reduce pain and inflammation.