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Navigation Basics: Map and Compass

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Navigation Basics: Map and Compass

Check out these great tips found on REI.com

Map and compass in the field

Together they form the first of the time-tested Ten Essentials—map and compass, the indispensible twin tools of navigation. Even in this high-tech GPS era, nothing replaces the value of a magnetized compass, a paper map and the understanding of how both can help you find your way in the wilderness.

Seek Instruction

This article and accompanying videos provide an overview of 2 primary navigational tools, map and compass. But even watching and reading every word will not turn any person into a skilled backcountry navigator.

Myth of the Month – Lightning Strikes

Monday, March 16th, 2009

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MYTH: Lightning can strike you only when the thunderstorm is in sight.

FACT: Lightning may travel up to 15 miles horizontally and strike out of the clear blue sky. Get into a protected area before the thunderstorm passes overhead and wait 30 minutes before heading back outside after the last thunder is heard or lightning is seen.

Backcountry Grub: What’s Safe to Eat and Drink?p

Thursday, November 20th, 2008

Dr. Chris VanTilburg

BACKCOUNTRY GRUB: WHAT’S SAFE TO EAT AND DRINK?

Christopher Van Tilburg, M.D.

In October, a solo climber on Washington’s 12,276-foot Mount Adams fell on Suksdorf Ridge, and broke his ankle. It’s just what every climber fears: being alone on a high mountain with a disastrous injury. Unable to walk, he dragged himself down the snowfields. After five days and nights, he was found at 6,200 feet suffering from frostbite and dehydration. He survived on creek water and an eclectic mix of creepy crawlers: ants, centipedes, spiders, mushrooms, and berries.

BE SAFE Tip – Lightning Strike Prevention

Thursday, July 31st, 2008

BE SAFE Outdoor Tip – Preventing Lightning

  • A lightning bolt can travel up to 15 miles
  • Seek shelter indoors or inside a vehicle
  • In a tent stay as far away from the poles an wet clothes as possible
  • Do not stand under a tall tree in an open field or on a ridge top
  • Get out an away from open water
  • Get off bicycles and golf carts
  • Stay away from wire fences, metal pipes or other metal objects that could carry the lightning bolt to you from a distance