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     Posts Tagged ‘Hypothermia’

Surviving the Backcountry: Tips on Training, Gear, & First Aid Supplies from Expedition #BeSafeGannett

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

#BeSafeGannet – 3 Days to Go!

This Friday, July 13th, #TeamTender will board a plane with all their gear and head out for Wyoming on the #BeSafeGannett Expedition up Gannett Peak. To say we’re excited would be an understatement! Although our expedition won’t physically begin until we reach the trailhead on July 14th, for our team the journey began over 8 months ago, and each day of training and preparation has taken us one step closer towards reaching the summit, a goal we hope to have achieved in less than 10 days from today.

Treating Hypothermia with the SOL All Season Blanket at the AR World Championships

Friday, March 2nd, 2018

During the 2017 Adventure Racing World Championships, Team Adventure® Medical Kits‘ captain and team medic Kyle Peter helped save a racer’s life using the Survive Outdoors Longer® All Season Blanket. When one team came into the transition area he was at with a racer suffering from severe hypothermia, Kyle jumped into action to treat him until medical help could arrive. 

Cold Water Immersion Survival

Friday, April 23rd, 2010

Spring boating season may be here, but water temperatures are still cold enough to cause problems for boating enthusiasts. Adventure Medical Kits’ marine medicine consultant Dr. Michael Jacobs provides tips for surviving cold water immersion.

Comp Guide to Marine Mediciine

AMK's A Comprehensive Guide to Marine Medicine inlcudes tips for treating hypothermia.

Don’t fool yourself into thinking the cold water you sail over is dangerous only when it contains pancake ice and glacial runoff; you could be dead wrong. In fact, water temperature as high as 60ºF can kill you just as easily. Fall into cold water without a personal flotation device (PFD; see sidebar below), and you could drown in the span of a few minutes, often within 10 feet of safety. Statistics indicate an incapacitating response that is rapid in onset and prevents individuals from swimming 10 feet to save their lives. Swimming ability does not improve survival.

HYPOTHERMIA: THE COLD HARD FACTS ABOUT WINTER’S DEADLY KILLER

Monday, December 29th, 2008


HYPOTHERMIA: THE COLD HARD FACTS ABOUT WINTER’S DEADLY KILLER
By Christopher Van Tilburg, M.D.

Rescue mission for a lost snowboarder: a bitter-cold, raging midnight storm high above timberline. That was the scene of my first search and rescue call to Oregon’s Mount Hood as a young doctor. After another team located the snowboarder, I scurried from the tempestuous black night to the ski patrol room, where I examined a shivering, huddling young man. He clutched a blanket draped over soaked ski clothes, and held a steaming cup of hot chocolate, too scalding to drink. Fortunately, the snowboarder had been found. But from across the room I could see he suffered from hypothermia and dehydration.

Backcountry Grub: What’s Safe to Eat and Drink?p

Thursday, November 20th, 2008

Dr. Chris VanTilburg

BACKCOUNTRY GRUB: WHAT’S SAFE TO EAT AND DRINK?

Christopher Van Tilburg, M.D.

In October, a solo climber on Washington’s 12,276-foot Mount Adams fell on Suksdorf Ridge, and broke his ankle. It’s just what every climber fears: being alone on a high mountain with a disastrous injury. Unable to walk, he dragged himself down the snowfields. After five days and nights, he was found at 6,200 feet suffering from frostbite and dehydration. He survived on creek water and an eclectic mix of creepy crawlers: ants, centipedes, spiders, mushrooms, and berries.

Consumer Comment – AMK Thermo-Lite Bivvy

Thursday, October 9th, 2008

Sent to us 4/25/07 from Peter, NY

I wanted to advise you of a recent accident that I had while hiking in Northern New York State. I have attached a news article from the New York State Department of Conservation. The article does not specifically mention one of your products but I want to advise you that it helped save my life. I purchased the Thermo Lite Emergency Bivy Sack at Eastern Mountain Sports, and I stayed in this shelter during my long night out. Please read the article attached and be advised that I truly can say that I was glad that I had this with me. This item along with food and staying hydrated kept my body temperature at 97 degrees for almost 18 hours while I was stuck outside, in temperatures that dropped to -23.