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Walking 60 Miles on Blisters – What I Learned

Wednesday, September 19th, 2018

We asked Ben Pasquino of Team Tender what he learned from the #BeSafeGannett Expedition. He had some first-hand experience with painful blisters he wanted to share.

Let me preface this with, I should have listen to Joe Miller about my boots. Always listen to your team leader when he tells you to break in new boots before setting out on a seven day journey into the backcountry. Here’s some other lessons I learned:

Don’t Ignore “Minor” Problems

You know that point where you realize that there may be an issue (physically)? Yea, I realized that at mile 2 of our 60 mile round-trip hike into the backcountry of the Bridger Wilderness.

As we walked out to Photographer’s Point the first 5 or so miles of day one, I realized I had a hot spot on the back of both my heels. Knowing that this would be a long hike and there were bound to be hot spots, I thought nothing of it. That was my first mistake: ignoring what I saw as a minor issue.

Photographer’s Point was when I first noticed the hot spots on my heels

So I kept on moving, thinking that my heels would be fine. I had been running multiple miles in training for this and had never gotten a blister on my heels. It couldn’t be happening now. About 12 miles in, we reached Little Seneca Lake, and there I realized I had a much bigger problem than just hot spots.

I took my shoes off to rest my feet, and that was when I got my first look at the blisters, or what had been a blister before it popped and my heel rubbed raw. That was another clue that this trip was going to be much more difficult than I anticipated.

Gluing Blisters Works – But Brace Yourself

Let me give you some context for what happened next. In preparation for this adventure, I took a Wilderness First Responder course back in New Hampshire through SOLO Schools, and we spoke about applying tincture of benzoin to a popped blister, or flap, to glue the flap of skin back where it belongs and protect the area. They said it would hurt pretty badly, but let me be the first to tell you, it hurts more than just “pretty badly.” It hurts like hell, and I know, because I had to do it twice.

gluing blisters

Getting ready to apply some tincture of benzoin from my Ultralight/Watertight .7 kit

I pulled the tincture of benzoin out of my Ultralight/Watertight .7 and borrowed some GlacierGel from my teammates. After painfully reattaching the flap of skin over the blister with the benzoin, I covered the area with GlacierGel to protect the blister from further damage and minimize the pain.

In the morning, we hit the trail again. As you can guess, it was slow hiking for me.

Healing Is Slow

We made it to the Titcomb basin on the second day, and thankfully we had scheduled 4 nights there. I took advantage of the 2 full days of rest for my heels to recuperate, wearing flip flops all day long while we took lifestyle pictures and instructional videos for our social media and webpage. I knew that letting my heels dry and allowing a scab to form would give me my best opportunity to make the push up Gannett. The blisters definitely needed the full two days.

The blisters took some time to scab over

The morning of Gannett, I left camp about 30 minutes before my team did to get a head start, and we met up at the base of Bonney Pass. We ended up finishing that day about 21 hours later and coming so close to the peak that we could almost throw a rock and hit it, but the decision to turn back was the right one for the team.

It’s a Long Way Home

The next day we turned back to make our way halfway out of the back country and the feeling of, “oh I may have an issue” quickly became, “I definitely have an issue, I just need to make it out.”

I still managed to have some great moments on the hike out though. We stopped at one of the most beautiful swimming holes that I’ve ever been to, just on the other side of Island Lake. It was an amazing feeling to just go for a swim and clean ourselves off from the long week’s grind.

The last day was a bit of a haul, as the team made the decision to trek the entire 15 miles (ish) out of the backcountry and get to a point to where I wouldn’t have to wear boots anymore. They also helped me by sharing the load of my backpack and encouraged me to continue moving.

Smile & Learn

I made it out, obviously, but that day was absolutely exhausting. I was able to smile at the end, and I am still able to smile about the experience. However, I did learn a lot. Two things especially stood out:

  1. BOOTS… always go for a couple hikes in them before putting them to the ultimate test. I only wore them around the office a couple times prior to the hike.
  2. The key to controlling the blisters and hot spots is simple… PREVENTION! As soon as you start to feel it, even if (really especially if) it’s mile 2 of a 60 mile hike, apply GlacierGel or moleskin. If worse comes to worse (and do know that it’s going to hurt like hell) you can always use tincture of benzoin to glue the blister shut and back to the skin, but trust me – you don’t want to reach the stage where this is necessary.

Having said all that, I can’t wait for the next adventure and to learn how to be more prepared for anything that gets thrown into the mix.

My team supported me the whole journey

About the Author

Name’s Ben Pasquino, 35 years of age, and I’ve been pushing my limits for my entire life. It just made logical sense to try my hand at mountaineering for the #BeSafeGannett Expedition. Previously an NCAA swimmer, I became an ultra-marathon runner after college. A CrossFit athlete and coach for nearly 5 years, I’m no stranger to hard work and following training regiments with an end goal in sight. I’m also an avid hunter and fly fisher.

4 Employees. 40 Miles. 13,804 ft. – Preparing for Gannett Peak

Wednesday, June 6th, 2018

Tender Corporation – parent company to brands like Adventure® Medical Kits, Survive Outdoors Longer®, Ben’s®, After Bite®, and Natrapel® – has always existed with a simple, unified goal: to help people enjoy the outdoors safely, even in the most remote locations. This July, Tender Corporation is sponsoring a team of four employees on an ascent up Gannett Peak to share how to prepare and train for a high peak expedition.

The Remote Beauty of Gannett Peak

The Wind River Range in Wyoming

Gannett Peak, located in the Wind River Range of the Rocky Mountains, is the highest mountain in Wyoming at 13,804 ft. and represents a unique mountaineering challenge. The broad, snow-capped summit rests upon a rocky base covered in five glaciers, all nestled in the remote wilderness of the Rockies.

View of Gannett Peak

Infamous for its inaccessibility, Gannett Peak requires the longest round trip approach of any state highpoint, with a minimum of 40 miles covered and a 9,000 ft. vertical climb.

Team Tender

Team Tender has been training for this expedition since January. Over the next month, they’ll be sharing tips on how to safely prepare for a journey of this magnitude, including emergency plans, gear considerations, and training regimens. During their week-long journey, they will be putting medical kits, survival bivvies, and insect protection to the test. They’ll also be posting live updates from the trail (and hopefully the summit!) on social media.

The team includes four employees who will be attempting the climb, as well as ground support from Tender Corporation’s Chief Marketing Officer Frank Meyer, who has previously summited Gannett Peak.

For the latest news during the planning process and live updates from the trail, make sure to follow Adventure® Medical Kits on Facebook and Instagram, as well as the different members of the team on Instagram. The team leaves New Hampshire for Wyoming on July 13th. #TeamTender #BeSafeGannett

Meet Team Tender!

Joe Miller – Trip Leader & Photographer

Instagram: @sir_st33zy

I was drawn to the woods from a young age. As I grew up, I kept finding ways to get closer and closer to the mountains, finally moving full time to the White Mountains of New Hampshire in 2015. In the White Mountains, I quickly bagged all the high peaks, learned the ropes of alpinism, and have since used New Hampshire as a home base for bigger adventures such as Thailand, Banff Canada, and multiple other US climbing destinations.  A Search and Rescue Member, I love adding new skills and experiences to my ever growing arsenal of backcountry travel, and Wind River Range is a must do on any outdoorsman radar. The challenge of bagging the highest peak in Wyoming in such a remote setting is intriguing to me in both a logistical and athletic sense.

Ben Pasquino – Official Mule & Gear Junkie

Instagram: @pasquinob1_nh

Name’s Ben Pasquino, 35 years of age, and I’ve been pushing my limits for my entire life. It just makes logical sense to try my hand at mountaineering. Previously an NCAA swimmer, I became an ultra-marathon runner after college. A CrossFit athlete and coach for nearly 5 years, I’m no stranger to hard work and following training regiments with an end goal in sight. Designated as the mule of the group, I’m stoked to test our fitness and see how far we push ourselves on this adventure up Gannett.

Chelsea Miller – Logistics Guru & Chef

Instagram: @mtnchels

I’m always scheming my next adventure.  Whether it’s this weekend’s hike or an after-work mountain bike ride, I’m constantly daydreaming about my next chance to get outside.  I love trip planning, maps, and lists; after ticking off NH’s 48 4,000 footers, I know the trails of the White Mountains like the back of my hand.  The opportunity to plan a trip to the Wind River Range is unbelievable. I’ve hiked and climbed all over New England and taken a number of trips across the country and the world to hike and climb. Taking on a high peak is an exciting next step on my mountaineering journey. Already, training for this expedition has pushed me past my perceived limits, and I’m excited to see what we’ll be able to accomplish as a team!

Jenny Hastings – Social Media Coordinator

 

Instagram: @jenpen_95

I fell in love with hiking from spending hours in the White Mountains with my dad, where my childhood tendency to dart ahead and scramble unnecessarily over rocks earned me the nickname “Mountain Goat.” As the mountains have gotten bigger as I’ve grown, I’ve been excited to meet each new challenge and reach each new summit. Gannett Peak represents the next step forward for me in my passion for mountains and will be my highest summit to date. At 5’1’’, I’m having to put on some muscle for this trip, but I’m training hard and enthusiastically rising to the challenge. I’m in charge of sharing our adventure with you through social media, and I can’t wait to share our journey and what I learn! As John Muir said – “The mountains are calling, and I must go.”

Frank Meyer – Expedition Coordinator (also our boss!)

Instagram: @ftmeyer50

Over 30 years ago, I co-founded the Adventure® Medical Kits brand to meet the need I saw and personally experienced for medical kits designed for people that are heading into remote locations and have to care for themselves. An avid skier, backpacker, and whitewater kayaker, I have put these first aid kits and other Tender Corporation products to the test both in my native Montana and on mountaineering expeditions, including a trip up Rainier and a previous summit of Gannett Peak with my son’s Boy Scout Venture Crew. I’m excited for Team Tender to experience Wyoming’s Wind River Range and attempt a summit of Wyoming’s highest and glaciated Gannett Peak (13,804′). I am looking forward to the feedback they give from extensive product testing in a range with quite volatile weather.